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Guiding Light discussion thread


Paul Raven

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, MichaelGL said:

I think Curlee would've excelled with the women, Monica, Lucy, Laura, etc. 

She would have been great with all of them and especially Bobbie too. She would have excelled with the Quartermaines and would likely have been intrigued by Justus as a new player within the family. And Simone and Keesha would have been more than just afterthoughts.

Tony’s post-B.J. downward spiral probably would have been handled with a lighter touch (less psycho, maybe more akin to Ed’s trauma after Maureen’s death?)

 

2 hours ago, Forever8 said:

How would you think a Nancy Curlee head written GH would've been? Which characters would you think she would've succeeded in penning? 

 

Edited by Faulkner
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Posted (edited)

She probably would have loved writing the initial Carly/Bobbie story, too, given how important Blake and Holly's mother/daughter dynamic was to her GL tenure. 

I think @titan1978 mentioned a few days ago that she also probably would have done a much better job of integrating the 'family man' Luke that Labine had fostered, with the more darker/sleezeball Luke that Geary and Guza loved so much, based on how much she was able to believably ground Roger Thorpe. 

And obviously since this is mid-90's, she would have been forced to carry the Sonny/Brenda torch...

Edited by BetterForgotten
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5 hours ago, Forever8 said:

How would you think a Nancy Curlee head written GH would've been? Which characters would you think she would've succeeded in penning? 

Nancy Curlee + Wendy Riche . . . hmmm.  Hard to say. They would seem to share similar taste in stories, but GH was a volatile, unhappy place in those days apparently. Too bad -- a stint at GH would have reunited NC with Patrick Mulcahey, who joined the GH writing team in 1996. They worked magic together.

Yes, it always puzzled me why NC's name was never mentioned (officially) as a head writer for GL in the Laibson and Rauch years. She obviously knew and loved GL. Maybe it was a P&G or CBS thing?

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Posted (edited)

NC would've inherited a soap in really good shape. The transition would've been seamless. I do wonder how NC would've handled the mob stuff? GH would've been so lucky to have had her. Instead we got dark Mob Hospital. Followed by Frank and his pets. 

Edited by victoria foxton
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3 hours ago, victoria foxton said:

NC would've inherited a soap in really good shape. The transition would've been seamless. I do wonder how NC would've handled the mob stuff? GH would've been so lucky to have had her. Instead we got dark Mob Hospital. Followed by Frank and his pets. 

Yeah, after the total focus on Stone, and then kind of meandering for a bit after he died, Labine’s team really set things up with nothing but potential.  They created Carly, Bobbie having memories of her abandoned baby, Jason’s accident and personality changes, and created Jax.  Guza inherited a really strong show.

3 hours ago, BetterForgotten said:

She probably would have loved writing the initial Carly/Bobbie story, too, given how important Blake and Holly's mother/daughter dynamic was to her GL tenure. 

I think @titan1978 mentioned a few days ago that she also probably would have done a much better job of integrating the 'family man' Luke that Labine had fostered, with the more darker/sleezeball Luke that Geary and Guza loved so much, based on how much she was able to believably ground Roger Thorpe. 

And obviously since this is mid-90's, she would have been forced to carry the Sonny/Brenda torch...

Yeah that was me- I do think we could have gotten a Luke that was pretty true to what Geary wanted but with the darker complications he wanted and she did so well with Roger, without going as far as Guza did.  I agree also that we would have had an infinitely stronger story for Carly and Bobbie.

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8 hours ago, Faulkner said:

She would have been great with all of them and especially Bobbie too. She would have excelled with the Quartermaines and would likely have been intrigued by Justus as a new player within the family. And Simone and Keesha would have been more than just afterthoughts.

Tony’s post-B.J. downward spiral probably would have been handled with a lighter touch (less psycho, maybe more akin to Ed’s trauma after Maureen’s death?)

What could have been, right?

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42 minutes ago, DRW50 said:

Murray Bartlett is on Locher's show at 3 Eastern. I can't remember if he ahs been on there before. 

This is his 3rd appearance.

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12 minutes ago, DRW50 said:

Thanks. Tells you how often I watch these. 

The first time he appeared by himself. The second appearance was a surprise pop in with other GL actors and the third one today by himself again.

Alan must have a crush on him.

I think Alan was there at the time Bartlett was on GL.

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12 minutes ago, Soapsuds said:

The first time he appeared by himself. The second appearance was a surprise pop in with other GL actors and the third one today by himself again.

Alan must have a crush on him.

I think Alan was there at the time Bartlett was on GL.

 

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Dec 1982

‘Guiding Light’ writer looks for fresh ideas

 

By TOM JORY Associated Press Writer

NEW YORK (AP) - “Guiding Light” has been a daytime companion for millions since 1937, starting on radio and switching to TV after 15 years. Can anything new, really new, ever happen to the Bauers or the Reardons or any of the other folks in Springfield? “I get really upset,” says Pamela Long Hammer, principal writer for the CBS soap opera since March, “because I’ll come up with this neat scenario and someone will say, ‘That’s like “Strangers on a Train.’” “I think, ‘They keep stealing my material.’ “The way I figure it,” she says, “there are only so many stories in the world. It’s the characters who keep the show new and exciting. All of our stories come from them: I don’t come up with a plot, and then work a character into it.” Continuity is important. Someone out there surely knows all that’s happened, to everyone on the show, in 46 years.

How about Miss Long Hammer? "Nope. I care about what our core families have been doing,” she says. “I’m always interested in what happened to Bert Bauer (played since 1950 by Charita Bauer) 20 years ago, but as far as going back and reading scripts, no. “Others on the show keep track,” she says. “I’ll suggest something, and be told, ‘You don’t remember, but five years ago, they had this terrible fight. They would never speak to one another now.”’

Miss Long Hammer, a former Miss Alabama who came to New York as an aspiring actress in 1980, began writing for daytime television while playing Ashley on NBC’s “Texas.” She eventually wrote herself out of the story. Her staff for “Guiding Light” includes nine writers, among them her husband, Charles Jay Hammer, whom she met while both worked on “Texas.” NBC dropped “Texas” after two seasons, and episodes from the serial currently are being rerun on the Turner Broadcasting System’s cable-TV SuperStation, WTBS.

Gail Kobe, who was executive producer of “Texas,” now has the same job on “Guiding Light.” And Beverlee McKinsey, who played Iris Carrington in “Another World” on NBC, and later in "Texas,” will join the Light” cast of the CBS soap in February. Miss Long Hammer is reponsible for the long-term story, which can mean looking ahead 18 months or more. Staff writers deal with specifics, including the scripts for individual episodes. She says she draws on “imagination and instinct” for the “Guiding Light” story. Often, that involves inventing new characters. “‘I look at Vanessa (Maeve Kinkead), one of our leading ladies,” Miss Long Hammer says. "What could make the audience care more about her? “Then I think, ‘Why can’t she find a man she can love, who will also love her?’ Voila, here comes Billy Lewis (Jordan Clarke).

“Another example,” she says, “is Alan Spaulding (Christopher Bernau). All of a sudden, he’s got a sister no one ever knew about. “They come complete,” says Miss Long Hammer of the serial’s characters, including the new ones. “We know who they are and where they came from long before the viewer gets all that information. That’s one of the most interesting things about daytime, the complexities of the characters.” The writers make a big effort to keep the show contemporary, and four of the leading players are in their late teens or early 20s Judi Evans, who plays Beth Raines, Kristi Tasreau (Mindy Lewis), Grant Alcksander (Philip Spaulding) and Michael O’Leary (Rick Bauer).

“Guiding Light,” longevity notwithstanding, is a moderate success by that ultimate yardstick of the industry; ratings. The show is behind only “General Hospital,” “All My Children” and “One Life to Live,” all on ABC, and CBS’ “The Young and the Restless,” among soaps. And Miss Long Hammer says she’s convinced writing is the key to even greater achievement. “When I say I love the characters, it’s not a light thing,” she says. “I think what the audience senses is an enthusiasm and an energy among the people who do the show.”

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1 hour ago, Paul Raven said:

Dec 1982

‘Guiding Light’ writer looks for fresh ideas

 

By TOM JORY Associated Press Writer

NEW YORK (AP) - “Guiding Light” has been a daytime companion for millions since 1937, starting on radio and switching to TV after 15 years. Can anything new, really new, ever happen to the Bauers or the Reardons or any of the other folks in Springfield? “I get really upset,” says Pamela Long Hammer, principal writer for the CBS soap opera since March, “because I’ll come up with this neat scenario and someone will say, ‘That’s like “Strangers on a Train.’” “I think, ‘They keep stealing my material.’ “The way I figure it,” she says, “there are only so many stories in the world. It’s the characters who keep the show new and exciting. All of our stories come from them: I don’t come up with a plot, and then work a character into it.” Continuity is important. Someone out there surely knows all that’s happened, to everyone on the show, in 46 years.

How about Miss Long Hammer? "Nope. I care about what our core families have been doing,” she says. “I’m always interested in what happened to Bert Bauer (played since 1950 by Charita Bauer) 20 years ago, but as far as going back and reading scripts, no. “Others on the show keep track,” she says. “I’ll suggest something, and be told, ‘You don’t remember, but five years ago, they had this terrible fight. They would never speak to one another now.”’

Miss Long Hammer, a former Miss Alabama who came to New York as an aspiring actress in 1980, began writing for daytime television while playing Ashley on NBC’s “Texas.” She eventually wrote herself out of the story. Her staff for “Guiding Light” includes nine writers, among them her husband, Charles Jay Hammer, whom she met while both worked on “Texas.” NBC dropped “Texas” after two seasons, and episodes from the serial currently are being rerun on the Turner Broadcasting System’s cable-TV SuperStation, WTBS.

Gail Kobe, who was executive producer of “Texas,” now has the same job on “Guiding Light.” And Beverlee McKinsey, who played Iris Carrington in “Another World” on NBC, and later in "Texas,” will join the Light” cast of the CBS soap in February. Miss Long Hammer is reponsible for the long-term story, which can mean looking ahead 18 months or more. Staff writers deal with specifics, including the scripts for individual episodes. She says she draws on “imagination and instinct” for the “Guiding Light” story. Often, that involves inventing new characters. “‘I look at Vanessa (Maeve Kinkead), one of our leading ladies,” Miss Long Hammer says. "What could make the audience care more about her? “Then I think, ‘Why can’t she find a man she can love, who will also love her?’ Voila, here comes Billy Lewis (Jordan Clarke).

“Another example,” she says, “is Alan Spaulding (Christopher Bernau). All of a sudden, he’s got a sister no one ever knew about. “They come complete,” says Miss Long Hammer of the serial’s characters, including the new ones. “We know who they are and where they came from long before the viewer gets all that information. That’s one of the most interesting things about daytime, the complexities of the characters.” The writers make a big effort to keep the show contemporary, and four of the leading players are in their late teens or early 20s Judi Evans, who plays Beth Raines, Kristi Tasreau (Mindy Lewis), Grant Alcksander (Philip Spaulding) and Michael O’Leary (Rick Bauer).

“Guiding Light,” longevity notwithstanding, is a moderate success by that ultimate yardstick of the industry; ratings. The show is behind only “General Hospital,” “All My Children” and “One Life to Live,” all on ABC, and CBS’ “The Young and the Restless,” among soaps. And Miss Long Hammer says she’s convinced writing is the key to even greater achievement. “When I say I love the characters, it’s not a light thing,” she says. “I think what the audience senses is an enthusiasm and an energy among the people who do the show.”

I don't think this article was from Dec 1982? Pam Long took over in March 1983 and her scripts began airing in May 83.  Alex first appeared in Feb 84. This article had to be Dec 83?

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1 hour ago, RavenWhitney said:

I don't think this article was from Dec 1982? Pam Long took over in March 1983 and her scripts began airing in May 83.  Alex first appeared in Feb 84. This article had to be Dec 83?

Sorry typo Yes it was Dec 83

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