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Edge of Night (EON) (No spoilers please)

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The funny thing about the 1975 ABC clip is they essentially redid that entire scene with Geraldine discovering Noel and Tracy. If you ever saw the CBS version (which is online, I believe) it's a little more low-key but just as dramatic.

I enjoy the ABC version, because Lois gets to deliver snarling lines over the top. And the best thing is it works. This is how good soaps can be.

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I realize she had a reputation for being a bit of a diva, but I believe Dixie Carter was one of the classiest, most "together" women out there.

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I guess it's the lighting. Frances Fisher and Terry Davis look like they have consumption.

(even after years it's still difficult to not accidentally type "Frances Farmer")

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Did anyone else see the picture of Larkin Malloy in the latest issue of Soap Opera Digest? Apparently, he's going to be seen a web soap called "Tainted Dreams." His appearance has changed quite a bit. I wouldn't have recognized him if not for the caption.

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I remember people talking about how he'd changed so much looks-wise back when he was on ATWT.

I keep hearing about that show. I don't know if I'll watch, but good luck to them.

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It is a tad disconcerting to see the actor who portrayed three of your favorite characters (Sky Whitney, Kyle Sampson and Travis Montgomery) look so differently in middle age.

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Can anyone fill me in on the Teresa Vetter story? I've been reading the Edge of Night Homepage Storylines section and it doesn't cover 1960 to 1963 or 1970 yet. Any feedback is appreciated. Thanx

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Here's a summary of August 29th 1960,which deals with Teresa Vetter.

ACT ONE

It’s late afternoon in the Vetter living room. George Vetter sits sipping the medicine Teresa has prepared for him. She stands, staring at a bouquet of roses, then becomes aware that nothing seems to be happening behind her. Slowly, she turns her head to look at George. He isn’t drinking now but holds the glass in his hand, seeming to have forgotten it as he stares somberly in thought. Frowning, Teresa reminds him that he’s not taking his medicine. George tells her that he’s supposed to sip this new stuff -- sip it slowly. He states that Dr. Ellis said the slower he drinks it... the more effect it’ll have. He then tells her that it’s also more powerful, which is why she has to be careful to measure just three drops into each glass of water. The doc said if there was ever any doubt about the mixture, to throw it away and make up another dose. Teresa comments that that kind of talk scares her, and George tells her she has nothing to fear. Tomorrow, after he sees the D.A., she won’t have anything to fear from anyone.

Teresa knows what he’s talking about but has to play it straight. She asks him what he means. George tells her he’s going to take care of Victor Carlsen and his brother once and for all! He says he would have taken care of them in that storage garage if somebody hadn’t tipped Victor off. Then, ashamed, he admits to Teresa how awful he felt when he suspected it was she. Teresa moves behind him and smoothes his hair, telling him not to blame himself. After all, it seemed as if she was the only one who could have. The phone rings and Teresa, telling George to sip his medicine, turns to answer it.

Victor is calling from the Carlsen drawing room, and Teresa covers by calling him "Betty." Assuming this is because George is still alive, Victor asks Teresa if anything’s gone wrong. Did she put the extra drops into George’s medicine, and did he drank it? Teresa says, "It’s being done now, Betty. But it’s the kind of thing that has to be handled slowly." She goes on, and in disguised words, tells him the new medicine may take longer to work than they thought. Victor presses her to call him the minute she knows the medicine has done the job they expect and hope it will.

Victor hangs up as Judith Marceau and his brother Jennings enter the drawing room. Victor at once assumes a troubled look and tells them he’s just had a call from Mrs. Vetter. He " breaks the news" to Jennings (who is in on everything) that their partner George Vetter has suddenly taken ill. Emotion overcomes him, and he hurries out, as Judith looks after him, stricken and full of sympathy.
COMMERCIAL

ACT TWO

SCENE 2A
George comments on Teresa’s conversation with "Betty." He says he was hoping it was the D.A. on the phone. Teresa wishes George would tell her what he wants to see the D.A. about, she has an idea and if she’s right it could mean prison for them as well as Victor and Jennings. George assures her it’ll mean the chair for the Carlsens, maybe even him, but not her. It won’t even mean prison for her. He’s going to make it clear to Austin Johnson that she’s innocent, that she had no idea the Vetter Insurance Office was a front for the numbers racket, that she was in no way involved in the racket or the murder of Goldie Golden. He says he should have done it long ago the very day he began to realize he’d gotten them involved in a business deal not with men, but with savage animals. Now he has no choice. He has to expose them and himself, if he’s to save her. She can’t imagine the vicious cruelty of a man like Victor Carlsen! He takes a sip of his medicine and feels a faint spasm that Teresa notices. He dismisses the feeling and tells her that Carlsen has planned to get rid of him all along because he wants her! Teresa rejects this notion saying she’s done nothing to encourage Victor and George quickly tells her he doesn’t suspect her but he does suspect Carlsen. He says that the quicker he clips Victor Carlsen’s claws, the safer Teresa will be. He then says he’s going to call the D.A. right away and gets to his feet, only to feel a wave of dizziness. He shakes his head as if to clear it as Teresa helps him to sit. George tells her to call the D.A. and he’ll tell her what to say. Thinking fast, Teresa tells him to settle back and finish his medicine. George gives her the number and she crosses to the phone. With her back to him, Teresa dials the number as she holds down the cradle.

SCENE 2B
In the Carlsen drawing room Judith is seated, looking troubled. Jennings stands beside her, careful to say the right thing without saying anything, unsure of what new tack Victor is on. Judith is questioning Jennings about Victor’s reaction to Mr. Vetter’s sudden illness. The news doesn’t seem to upset Jennings as much as it did Victor. Jennings says his emotions are more controlled than Victor’s. "Victor is more sensitive, more sentimental than I am," he states. Victor enters with a pale, wan smile that asks for sympathy. He apologizes for acting like a fool, saying the news of George’s illness took him by surprise and tells Judith he’s not going to let his problems ruin her visit. Judith says she has to be going anyway and Victor invites her to stay for dinner. She says she’d like to but she’s supposed to drop by Mrs. Karr’s house to discuss some things that have to do with the Youth Ranch money-raising things. Victor says he’s not trying to lure her into staying for dinner, this whole thing with Mr. Vetter makes him feel lost alone he just needed someone to lean on. The guilt trip clearly works on Judith as she impulsively tells him that perhaps she can stay. She can call Sara, Mrs. Karr, and tell her she’ll be late. Jennings gives her a look that seems to say "Could you, for him?", and Judith crosses to the phone. As she does Victor silently compliments Jennings on his adroit ploymanship which Jennings silently accepts.
COMMERCIAL

ACT THREE

A short time later in the Vetter living room, George has all but finished the medicine. He takes one last gulp as he eyes Teresa through the bottom of the glass. A numbness that he mistakes for relaxation is slowly starting to creep over him. Teresa takes the glass from his hand as George settles back, closing his eyes. Teresa crosses to the sideboard with the glass and places it near the medicine bottle. She turns and her eyes narrow on George. George suddenly says her name and Teresa’s face reflects the question, "Is this it?". He says it again, this time with a faint note of panic, "Teresa!"

COMMERCIAL
STATION BREAK

ACT THREE

Teresa smiles as she walks toward George. He has started up to a half-sitting position and tells her he feels funny, as if he’s drifting...floating. Teresa reminds him the medicine is supposed to relax him. George wonders why it effects him so much more now than ever before. He questions Teresa about the amount of drops she used, emphasizing the use of only three drops. She assures him she was very careful, as George continues to complain about feeling strange. He closes his eyes and begins to dream about the past, smiling as he remembers.

Suddenly the smile vanishes and sadness sits on his mouth. He whispers brokenly to Teresa that something seems wrong. She better phone Dr. Ellis. Teresa watches him a moment, thinking, then she goes to the phone and dials. Victor answers the phone in the Carlsen drawing room, while Teresa pretends she’s talking to Dr. Ellis. Teresa tells Dr. Ellis that her husband asked her to call him. He seems worried about the new medicine. Victor asks Teresa if this is "it", and Teresa replies, "Yes . I’d say so, Doctor." Victor directs her to phone the doctor as soon as it happens and get him over there. She needs to play it smart. She’s grief-stricken but under control. He warns her not to overdo anything. Don’t talk too much, or offer too much information. Then he asks her about the bottle of medicine...if her fingerprints are on it. When she says yes, he tells her to wipe them off then see to it that George’s prints are on it. Press the bottle into his hand.

Victor hangs up, smiling tightly and is about to turn from the phone when he hears someone approaching. He remains at the phone and puts on a deeply sad expression as Judith enters the drawing room. She starts to tell Victor she’s ready for supper but breaks off as he turns toward her, and she sees the sorrow in his face. She crosses to him quickly asking him what’s wrong. Victor tells her he just spoke to Mrs. Vetter again, and they think George is dying. What will he do without him? He depended on him. If George dies, Victor will have no one to turn to for advice and encouragement. He stares at the floor biting his underlip, as if holding back his emotions. Touched, Judith lays a hand on his arm. He looks up slowly to meet her eyes. She smiles sympathetically, and his answering smile is grateful as he lays his hand over hers.

Back in the Vetter living room Teresa still stands at the phone, her hand resting on it, her eyes on George. She asks George if he heard what the doctor said. When she doesn’t get a response she crosses to him and looks down at him. Is he dead? His eyes are closed, he is motionless. She takes hold of his wrist feeling for his pulse and frowns. Inexpert at feeling for pulse beats, she can’t be sure he’s dead even though she can’t feel any pulse. She releases his wrist, then lays her hand over his heart. Does she feel anything? All of a sudden his hand comes up and grabs her wrist. His eyes are watching her. He asks her faintly, dreamily, "Terry, what are you doing?" Teresa is startled. Does he suspect? She swallows hard, very hard.
COMMERCIAL

ACT FOUR

Recovering, Teresa tells George that Dr. Ellis said he has nothing to worry about. George smiles dreamily and closes his eyes again. After a moment or two, his hand slips off hers. She immediately straightens up and looks down at him. She says his name a couple of times again no sound, no movement. She crosses to the medicine bottle, taking a handkerchief from her pocket as she does so. Her eyes stay on George as she wipes the bottle clean of fingerprints. Holding the bottle carefully with the handkerchief she returns to George. She picks up his hand, places the bottle in it and presses his fingers around it. George lets out a little sigh and Teresa’s eyes stab at him. It’s all right; he’s too far-gone to have noticed anything. Now, holding the bottle with the handkerchief around the screwcap, she starts to slip it into his dressing gown pocket. Her hand touches on something else and she brings out the gun George put there earlier. She slips the bottle into his pocket, and then carefully wipes the gun clean of her fingerprints. Holding it by the barrel she presses the gun into George’s hand. His fingerprints are on it. His alone. She carries the gun wrapped in the handkerchief to the desk and places it in the drawer . . . then she scans the room. Has she overlooked anything? She crosses to George and peers at him for a long moment. She takes a hold of his wrist, raises it and lets it fall, a dead weight. She looks toward the phone. If George isn’t dead, he soon will be. She can certainly make the call without fear of anything going wrong. She crosses to the phone, dials and waits. When Dr. Ellis answers Teresa pretends to be agitated, asking him to come over right away! It’s terribly urgent!
COMMERCIAL

Edited by Paul Raven

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