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danfling

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About danfling

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  • Birthday 12/15/1955

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  1. danfling

    Soap Hoppers

    Robin Matson was also an actress who played a number of recast roles. (The Guiding Light, Ryan's Hope, All My Children, the serial General Hospital, the serial Santa Barbara).
  2. danfling

    As The World Turns Full Episode List

    I am sure that you know that Glynnis O'Connor debuted on As the World Turns in the 1970s.
  3. danfling

    Radio Soap Opera Discussion

    One of my favorite television producers was Luci Rittenberg Ferri, longtime producer of The Guiding Light. I am seeking any information that I can find about her. There is nothing printed about her anywhere that I have looked. I am wondering if, perhaps, she also produced radio soap operas?
  4. danfling

    Dark Shadows

    Soaplovers, I am in agreement. I think that the original story by Art Wallace was the best part of the show.
  5. danfling

    Soap Hoppers

    I am sure that STAATS COTSWORTH appeared on Somerset. My memory is not perfect, but I believe that he played a physician who treated Missy Matthews (probably when she had drunk some un-pasteurized milk at the carnival.)
  6. danfling

    Soap Hoppers

    There has been a lot of discussion about Mrs. Yost on The Edge of Night and who played her. I remember Mrs. Yost, and she was played by the late Selma Diamond. I don't argue that Norma Connelly did not play the character as well, but I missed her episodes if she did. Also, I was about to add that Elizabeth Franz had played Wilma Marlow #2 on All My Children. However, I then realized that her look-alike (at least to me) Ruby Holbrook had played Wilma #2. Jo Henderson (who had created the role) later returned to it, and the actress who had said "It's not nice to fool with Mother Nature" played her in the end of the run.
  7. danfling

    Dark Shadows

    Nearly all of the episode were cliff-hangers. I don't think that too many were self contained.
  8. danfling

    As The World Turns Discussion Thread

    Actor James Karen, who played Dr. Burke on As the World Turns, has passed away. I will post an obituary when I have one to share.
  9. danfling

    AMC Tribute Thread

    Actor James Karen, who played Lincoln Tyler #1 on All My Children, has passed away. I will print an obituary when I have one to share. I just saw him the other night on a documentary about Greta Garbo.
  10. danfling

    The soap opera writers' discussion

    I just learned that Wayne Greenhaw wrote Hidden Faces (along with the show's creator, Irving Vendig). from the Encyclopedia of Alabama: Wayne Greenhaw Barry M. Cole, University of Montevallo Writer and poet Wayne Greenhaw (1940-2011) produced a broad spectrum of fiction and nonfiction books, two plays, poetry, travel guides, and scripts for film and television. Greenhaw's writing reflects strong advocacy of the civil rights movement, expressed vividly through personal reflections. As a journalist in the 1960s, Greenhaw directly witnessed the civil rights movement as it unfolded through his personal association with movement leader E. D. Nixon during the Selma to Montgomery March. Since that time, many of his works have focused on civil rights. Greenhaw's writing is not limited to any one style or genre, although he has named Harper Lee as his primary influence, as well as individuals he met during the civil rights movement. Wayne Greenhaw in Montgomery Harold Wayne Greenhaw was born in Sheffield, Colbert County, into a troubled family; he grew up in Trussville and Tuscaloosa. Greenhaw contracted polio as an infant, causing health problems, including a curvature of the spine, that persisted through his teen years. At the age of 14, he underwent major surgery to correct his spine and was confined to a body cast for six months. During that time, he read extensively and learned to love literature. After graduating from high school in Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, Greenhaw moved to Mexico at the age of 18 to study creative writing at the Instituto Allende in San Miguel de Allende in the summer of 1959. He returned to Tuscaloosa and entered the University of Alabama to study writing under English professor Hudson Strode. In 1958, Greenhaw gained part-time employment as a sports reporter for the Tuscaloosa News. He served as sports columnist for the Graphics Weekly from 1963 to 1964 and worked as a writer assigned to an educational project at Draper Correctional Center from 1964 to 1965. He then took a position as a general assignment reporter for the Alabama Journal newspaper in 1965 and completed a B.S. in education at the University of Alabama in 1966. His first novel, The Golfer, was published shortly thereafter in 1967. In 1971, Greenhaw published an article on the My Lai massacre (the mass murder of Vietnamese civilians by members of the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War) that earned him a Nieman Fellowship to study journalism at Harvard University in 1972. He became Jimmy Carter's press secretary in Alabama during the 1976 presidential campaign. That same year, Greenhaw penned an editorial in the New York Times exposing Alabamian white supremacist Asa Carter as the author of The Education of Little Tree, a supposed biography that Carter had written under the pseudonym Forrest Carter. In 1982, he published Elephant in the Cotton Fields: Ronald Reagan and the New Republican South and two years later published Flying High: Inside Big-Time Drug Smuggling. From 1984 to 1988, he was editor and publisher of Alabama Magazine. Several of Greenhaw's books center on the state of Alabama and Montgomery in particular. Examples include Alabama on My Mind: Politics, People, History, and Ghost Stories (1988), Montgomery: Center Stage in the South: A Contemporary Portrait (1990) and Montgomery: The Biography of a City (1994). In 1993, Gov. Jim Folsom appointed Greenhaw as director of the Alabama Bureau of Tourism (now the Alabama Tourism Department). In 1995, Pres. Bill Clinton appointed him as a representative to the White House Conference on Travel and Tourism. That same year, the Southeast Tourism Society named Greenhaw Travel Writer of the Year. Greenhaw continued to write, publishing Alabama: Portrait of a State in 1998 Fighting the Devil in Dixie and Beyond the Night: A Remembrance the following year. The latter work is a poignant telling of a young boy's near-death experience. In 2000, Greenhaw was appointed to the board of directors of the Alabama Humanities Foundation by Gov. Don Siegelman. In 2006, he co-authored with Donnie Williams The Thunder of Angels, which details the struggle for racial equality in Alabama. His writing was augmented by frequent lectures and seminars. Greenhaw was the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including the Harper Lee Award from the Alabama Writers Conclave and the Hackney Literary Award from Birmingham-Southern College. Greenhaw published several hundred articles in publications ranging from Reader's Digest to Music City News. Residing in both Alabama and Mexico, he produced works in English and Spanish and found common ground in both places in his writing. Greenhaw died on May 31, 2011, in Birmingham from complications related to heart surgery. Selected Works by Wayne Greenhaw The Golfer (1967) "Is Forrest Carter Really Asa Carter? Only Josey Wales May Know for Sure" (1976) King of Country (1994) Beyond the Night (1999) My Heart is in the Earth (2001) The Thunder of Angels: The Montgomery Bus Boycott and the People Who Broke the Back of Jim Crow (2006) Fighting the Devil in Dixie: How Civil Rights Activists Took on the Ku Klux Klan in Alabama (2011) Additional Resources Best, Ricky, and Jason Kneip. Guide to the Papers of Wayne Greenhaw. Montgomery, Ala.: AUM Library, Archives & Special Collections, 2005. Dixon, Joyce. "My Heart Is In The Earth: An Interview with Author Wayne Greenhaw." Southern Scribe, 2001. [See Related Links]
  11. danfling

    Hidden Faces

    For many years, I have wondered if Irving Vendig had written this show by himself or if he had another writer. I had even asked Louise Shaffer (who had replied that she never looked at the name of the writer that early in her career). Tonight, I have learned that Wayne Greenhaw also wrote the show with Mr. Vendig. from the Encyclopedia of Alabama: Wayne Greenhaw Barry M. Cole, University of Montevallo Writer and poet Wayne Greenhaw (1940-2011) produced a broad spectrum of fiction and nonfiction books, two plays, poetry, travel guides, and scripts for film and television. Greenhaw's writing reflects strong advocacy of the civil rights movement, expressed vividly through personal reflections. As a journalist in the 1960s, Greenhaw directly witnessed the civil rights movement as it unfolded through his personal association with movement leader E. D. Nixon during the Selma to Montgomery March. Since that time, many of his works have focused on civil rights. Greenhaw's writing is not limited to any one style or genre, although he has named Harper Lee as his primary influence, as well as individuals he met during the civil rights movement. Wayne Greenhaw in Montgomery Harold Wayne Greenhaw was born in Sheffield, Colbert County, into a troubled family; he grew up in Trussville and Tuscaloosa. Greenhaw contracted polio as an infant, causing health problems, including a curvature of the spine, that persisted through his teen years. At the age of 14, he underwent major surgery to correct his spine and was confined to a body cast for six months. During that time, he read extensively and learned to love literature. After graduating from high school in Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, Greenhaw moved to Mexico at the age of 18 to study creative writing at the Instituto Allende in San Miguel de Allende in the summer of 1959. He returned to Tuscaloosa and entered the University of Alabama to study writing under English professor Hudson Strode. In 1958, Greenhaw gained part-time employment as a sports reporter for the Tuscaloosa News. He served as sports columnist for the Graphics Weekly from 1963 to 1964 and worked as a writer assigned to an educational project at Draper Correctional Center from 1964 to 1965. He then took a position as a general assignment reporter for the Alabama Journal newspaper in 1965 and completed a B.S. in education at the University of Alabama in 1966. His first novel, The Golfer, was published shortly thereafter in 1967. In 1971, Greenhaw published an article on the My Lai massacre (the mass murder of Vietnamese civilians by members of the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War) that earned him a Nieman Fellowship to study journalism at Harvard University in 1972. He became Jimmy Carter's press secretary in Alabama during the 1976 presidential campaign. That same year, Greenhaw penned an editorial in the New York Times exposing Alabamian white supremacist Asa Carter as the author of The Education of Little Tree, a supposed biography that Carter had written under the pseudonym Forrest Carter. In 1982, he published Elephant in the Cotton Fields: Ronald Reagan and the New Republican South and two years later published Flying High: Inside Big-Time Drug Smuggling. From 1984 to 1988, he was editor and publisher of Alabama Magazine. Several of Greenhaw's books center on the state of Alabama and Montgomery in particular. Examples include Alabama on My Mind: Politics, People, History, and Ghost Stories (1988), Montgomery: Center Stage in the South: A Contemporary Portrait (1990) and Montgomery: The Biography of a City (1994). In 1993, Gov. Jim Folsom appointed Greenhaw as director of the Alabama Bureau of Tourism (now the Alabama Tourism Department). In 1995, Pres. Bill Clinton appointed him as a representative to the White House Conference on Travel and Tourism. That same year, the Southeast Tourism Society named Greenhaw Travel Writer of the Year. Greenhaw continued to write, publishing Alabama: Portrait of a State in 1998 Fighting the Devil in Dixie and Beyond the Night: A Remembrance the following year. The latter work is a poignant telling of a young boy's near-death experience. In 2000, Greenhaw was appointed to the board of directors of the Alabama Humanities Foundation by Gov. Don Siegelman. In 2006, he co-authored with Donnie Williams The Thunder of Angels, which details the struggle for racial equality in Alabama. His writing was augmented by frequent lectures and seminars. Greenhaw was the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including the Harper Lee Award from the Alabama Writers Conclave and the Hackney Literary Award from Birmingham-Southern College. Greenhaw published several hundred articles in publications ranging from Reader's Digest to Music City News. Residing in both Alabama and Mexico, he produced works in English and Spanish and found common ground in both places in his writing. Greenhaw died on May 31, 2011, in Birmingham from complications related to heart surgery. Selected Works by Wayne Greenhaw The Golfer (1967) "Is Forrest Carter Really Asa Carter? Only Josey Wales May Know for Sure" (1976) King of Country (1994) Beyond the Night (1999) My Heart is in the Earth (2001) The Thunder of Angels: The Montgomery Bus Boycott and the People Who Broke the Back of Jim Crow (2006) Fighting the Devil in Dixie: How Civil Rights Activists Took on the Ku Klux Klan in Alabama (2011) Additional Resources Best, Ricky, and Jason Kneip. Guide to the Papers of Wayne Greenhaw. Montgomery, Ala.: AUM Library, Archives & Special Collections, 2005. Dixon, Joyce. "My Heart Is In The Earth: An Interview with Author Wayne Greenhaw." Southern Scribe, 2001. [See Related Links]
  12. danfling

    OLTL Tribute Thread

    It was during the absence of Ms. Slezak that Victoria and Ted were having most of their scenes. (I preferred Keith Charles in the role. I like Mark Goddard, but I preferred him on The Doctors).
  13. danfling

    OLTL Tribute Thread

    Ms. Jones substituted for Ms. Slezak during her maternity leave. I am unable to tell you the specific length, but it seemed to be several months. I missed the Judith Barcroft appearance on One Life to Live. It was probably less that three days, I would imagine.
  14. danfling

    OLTL Tribute Thread

    The imposter who pretended to be the step-father came to Llanview, as I remember, to get control of Tina (and, consequently, her inheritance from Irene). He and Victoria became attracted to one another, and he hoped to marry her before the truth was revealed. I don't remember drugs being involved, but my memory may be hazy.
  15. danfling

    Cancelled Soaps Cast Lists

    Gordon Rigsby and Jada Rowland had worked together on The Secret Storm when they played Ian #1 and Amy #1.
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