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Brent

"Secret Storm" memories.

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I've seen it listed as April 18th as Paul and Amy's return date in other papers. Here's another casting announcement.

Jada Rowland and Nicolas Coster will re-create the featured roles of Amy and Paul Britton on “The Secret Storm,” starting when the they rejoin the cast of the daytime drama series telecast in color Monday through Friday at 4 o’clock on Channel 2.

The return of the Brittons, husband and wife, to the mythical town of Woodbridge, N.Y., after a year’s absence, will have a profound influence on the large upstate community in future episodes of the series.

Others joining the cast of the serial in April are Christina Crawford as Joan Kane, Keith Charles as her husband, Ncik Kane, and Marla Adams as Belle Clemens.

I believe this was the article Brent was talking about earlier

Costumes Character

CLOTHES DO MAKE THE CHARACTER, as portrayed by the clothes chosen by Doreen Ackerman for the roles played on the CBS daytime drama, “The Secret Storm.” Refined blazer and culotte (left) by Sportempos are typical of Valerie Aes, played by Lori March, who always displays good taste with a touch of conservatism. Susan Dunbar, who in private life is Judy Lewis, Loretta Young’s daughter, takes time out from her career to don Paris-inspired, ostrich trimmed chiffon dress for evening, while Melissa Tyson, portrayed by Angela Thornton, shows off a boa of coq feathers on a matching peach crepe, one-shouldered dress. These are by Jennesse. Houndstooth check of silver and black glitter (right) are united on this divided pantsdress worn by Wendy Porter, a fashion-independent teen-ager played by Juli Mannix. This is an Arpeja creation.

Clothes Are Integral Part of The Players on Stage, Television

Anyone who faithfully watches a serial on television begins to associate the players with the role they play.

Any although in real life these people may be nothing like the characters they portray, the costumer for the program must also think of them as they come across in their roles. For the clothes they wear are an integral part of the way they come across to the audience. The wrong choice of clothes could even change the impression given when a line is spoken.

Anyone familiar with the characters on CBS’ The Secret Strom knows they are people of means who possess refined good taste. They shop in their local department store, Tyrell’s, which could easily be the best department store in any city.

Doreen Ackerman, who has complete charge of selecting the costumes for the show is surprised at the amount of ma garments seen on the show can be purchased. And she is more amazed that friends and relatives say that many of the characters are so sharply defined by their clothes.

“They don’t realize that it’s all preplanned with exactly that purpose in mind – that each day, I, and not the characters, lay out what they will wear on the next show.”

Doreen begins the task of costuming the show by covering the Seventh Ave. fashion market each season and selecting a basic wardrobe for each character, including accessories. Each personality is treated separately, so much so that each has her own closet in the wardrobe room. Doreen knows that she must dress characters, rather than actresses.

“My greatest pleasure,” she said, “is watching their eyes light up when a new shipment of clothes comes in. Often they buy them for their own use.”

Doreen’s excellent background in acting at New York University, costume design at the Yale Graduate School of Drama and current co-ownership of Ackerman-Michaels, a firm which makes couture at-home and evening wear, enables her to make the episode of fashion cohesive with real life in the selections she makes for the program.

Many times the clothes seen on this daytime drama show serve as an advance fashion source for the viewers. For often the clothes worn have not yet reached the stores. It is a timely way to keep abreast of fashion trends from the young, swinging set to the more conservative group, as the age range on The Secret Storm is all-inclusive.

Whereas in the 1930s and ‘40s Hollywood was a prime source in education of the public to major fashion looks, via Dietrich, Crawford or Lombard, today fashion is a day-to-day happening and changes as often as the weather. And here it is projected right on the television screen as soon as it leaves top designers’ salons.

There is much more to this constant clothes selection than meets the eye. For instance, the fact that the show now appears in color presents new problems for Doreen.

Each actress has her own home, or set, which remains constant from day to day. And if one character has a green living room, her clothes as well as those of other players who enter her home must be in greens, golds, and browns.

“A hot pink dress, as pretty as it may be in a green room,” claims Doreen would look like a carnival color on the screen.”

The selection of clothes for this show proves that drama and fashion have lots in common. And those who are at home during the day to watch can reap the bonus of a free lesson in what au courant in design along with good entertainment.

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I thought another actress played Amy after Jada left and stayed into 1968. Is this not true or did they just write Paul and Amy out a few months prior?

It is not true. Jada Rowland quit Secret Storm twice. She left in 1958 and was replaced first by Beverly Lunsford, who was recast for a short period in 1960 by June Carter. Jada left again in 1971, when Lynne Adams (Leslie Bauer from Guiding Light) assumed the part. Both times Amy remained on the canvas. Around late 1966/ early 1967, Jada Rowland and Nic Coster were let go from the soap. In the story, Amy and Paul moved to Cincinnati and were not recast. As the other poster stated, Amy and Paul returned in April 1968, just as Charlie Clemens' daughter Belle arrived in Woodbridge with her daughter Robin. The following month, Amy and Belle's younger sister Karen took Robin on a Memorial Day picnic to the lake. This was Secret Storm's first location shoot. Robin fell into the water and drowned. Belle blamed Amy for Robin's death, and developed a pathological hatred of the Ames family. Belle vowed to make Amy pay by losing Paul, whom Belle seduced. This was the catalyst for a very memorable, long running rivalry between the two women.

Edited by saynotoursoap

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Thanks for filling me in! I had no idea that Jada had been let go from SS or that they had been written Amy out. I wish there wasn't so much false information out there throughout the first three decades of the soaps.

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Has anyone seen Lunsford or Carter in the role?

Carl, June Carter's Amy appears in the episode below. This is immediately before Jada returned the first time. Inexplicably, a blonde was cast.

Edited by saynotoursoap

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Thanks! She is OK, I guess. She seems a little more unsympathetic than Jada.

She is too hardy for Amy. Jada worked so well because she was frail and waifish. This girl looks as if she is ready for a night at the sock hop with both Robbie and Chip from My Three Sons. I have never seen Beverly Lunsford in the part, but she also was fair-haired and a bit too va-va-va voom for sad little Amy.

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I guess the return of Paul and Amy coincided with the arrival of Belle as that was where the storyline was headed.Were there new writers at that time?

During her time away from Storm,Jada went to ATWT and played Susan.I wonder what the circumstances were.Jada replaced Diana Walker.Was it a case of ATWT not being happy with Walker or did they drop her when Jada became available?

Again when Jada left,was it because she was lured back to SS with the promise of a new story or did the role of Susan not work out?

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June Carter also played Cookie for a time on The Edge of Night. The Cookie role was created by Fran Sharon, and she returned to it. Ms. Sharon was playing it thoughout most of the 1960s.

I had seen this clip of June Carter previously.

Although I know of no clips of Beverly Lunsford on The Secret Storm, but she appears on reruns of Leave It to Beaver as one of Wally's friends.

Jada Rowland left the show THREE times: when Ms. Carter and Ms. Lunsford played the role, when she was playing Susan on As the World Turns, and when she left and Amy was played by Lynn Adams.

That Amy (other than Jada Rowland) was lighter-haired is not out of character for the soap operas in the 1960s. The role of Patti Tate on Search for Tomorrow was played by every physical type of actress. (And, even MUCH later, Mike Roy on All My Children was played by two very different actors.)

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I guess the return of Paul and Amy coincided with the arrival of Belle as that was where the storyline was headed.Were there new writers at that time?

John Hess' script collection is available at Darmouth. Based on the catalogue information, he was headwriter of the show from March 1967 until July 1968 so he probably wrote the Brittons out and wrote them back in.

A columnist from around this time period wrote the following letter which gives you some details about the stories in this period.

Dear Valerie Ames:

I’ve been watching you on “Secret Storm” for 11 years, and what I want to know is, how come you never scrub your floors? For that matter, how come you never put your hair in rollers or sweep down the cobwebs in the basement or loll around the house without your shoes?

Maybe it’s because you’ve learned that whenever the phone or doorbell rings, it is NOT going to be somebody asking you to bring a cake to the PTA. It’s going to be someone like your son, Bob, who called the other week to tell you that you had been named correspondent in a divorce action brought by Joan Kane against her husband Nick, who works for the paper owned by your second husband now deceased. And since all you were doing was sitting around in your Givinchy cocktail dress and single strand of pearls, you had only to button your coat and give your bubble cut a pat before sashaying off to see your lawyer.

Or maybe you’re too busy mixing drinks to do any housework. I’ve noticed that whenever problems arise – which is at the rate of one every ten minutes – the drinks flow like water from a busted hydrant. For instance, when your stepdaughter, Amy, dropped in to tell you she thought her professor husband was having an affair with your boarder, Belle, who at the time was thought to be dying of an incurable disease, you said, “Let me fix you a drink, dear. I was about to have one myself.”

And when you other son, Jerry, stopped in to tell you the paper was on the verge of bankruptcy, you said, “Can you stay for lunch?” and he said, “No, but I would appreciate a drink.”

Remember last month when Belle’s illegitimate daughter, Robin, fell out of the rowboat and drowned and Amy was accused of doing it on purpose by Belle because Amy knew Belle had been messing around with her husband, the professor? Boy, was that a wet week!

I think I have it figured out, though. During the commercials, the doll with the sponge mop comes in and cleans your floors with foamy stuff that cleans, waxes, polished and disinfects all at once, and with the time she saves, she rinses out the highball glasses.

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Jada Rowland left the show THREE times: when Ms. Carter and Ms. Lunsford played the role, when she was playing Susan on As the World Turns, and when she left and Amy was played by Lynn Adams)

Jada did not leave when she went to As the World Turns to play Susan. She was dropped involuntarily from Secret Storm. The other two times, she did leave of her own accord.

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