Jump to content

Recommended Posts

22 hours ago, Neil Johnson said:

 

I can't remember.  It was well known at the time, which actress took the role on DOOL, but I just don't remember now.  Maybe somebody else will.   I remember one of David Forsythe's lines on the DOOL episode was extremely insulting to AW fans.  It was all very indirect, of course.  But the end of his line was something like, "Why don't they just get over it?"   

 

It was the beginning of the 90-minute episodes when the ratings took severe plunge.  From #2 in the ratings all the way to #8, I believe.   The 90-minute transition was a fiasco, even with Lemay writing.  Lemay didn't lose his touch, but the 90-minute thing just didn't work.  Shortly after Lemay left in April 1979, the ratings fell further to #9 and then never got above #9 for the final 20 years of the show.   

 

8 hours ago, AbcNbc247 said:

That might’ve worked but the big mystery is that would Lemay and King have been able change their style and adhere to that action/adventure, youth oriented type of storytelling? In his book, Lemay even said he didn’t like writing for the younger actors and characters except for Ray Liotta’s Joey.

 

Lemay also said he wanted Tom King to succeed him but he criticized a lot of things that Tom King had written. He didn’t like that Mac and Rachel were divorced and that Mac took Amanda from Rachel and gave her to Janice, he didn’t like the Kirk Laverty murder mystery and he hated that Janice tried to poison Mac. It was too melodramatic for him apparently.

 

22 hours ago, Neil Johnson said:

 

I can't remember.  It was well known at the time, which actress took the role on DOOL, but I just don't remember now.  Maybe somebody else will.   I remember one of David Forsythe's lines on the DOOL episode was extremely insulting to AW fans.  It was all very indirect, of course.  But the end of his line was something like, "Why don't they just get over it?"   

 

It was the beginning of the 90-minute episodes when the ratings took severe plunge.  From #2 in the ratings all the way to #8, I believe.   The 90-minute transition was a fiasco, even with Lemay writing.  Lemay didn't lose his touch, but the 90-minute thing just didn't work.  Shortly after Lemay left in April 1979, the ratings fell further to #9 and then never got above #9 for the final 20 years of the show.   

I think the 90 min episode was the John Randolph dying in the fire.  I am almost positive, AW was already in the back of the pack of #8 before this episode even.  I could be wrong but if you look at the ratings a few months prior to March it was at the top but rapidly declined and even if the 90 mins was a downer, I dont understand how in such a short amount of time a top rated rated show would be one the least rated in just weeks.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 6.6k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

1 hour ago, denzo30 said:

 

 

I think the 90 min episode was the John Randolph dying in the fire.  I am almost positive, AW was already in the back of the pack of #8 before this episode even.  I could be wrong but if you look at the ratings a few months prior to March it was at the top but rapidly declined and even if the 90 mins was a downer, I dont understand how in such a short amount of time a top rated rated show would be one the least rated in just weeks.  

 

The episode in which John Randolph saved Alice and then died in the fire was actually the second 90-minute episode, March 6, 1979.  The first was March 5, and as I recall, it heavily featured Mac and Rachel.  

 

And regarding the ratings, it's been my understanding AW was #1 in the ratings during the Sven storyline, and then settled to #2 after that plot concluded.  Then stayed at #2 until March when the show expanded to 90-minutes and the ratings plunged to number 8.  It was said at the time that AW lost half of its audience because of the 90-minute expansion.  I supposed we'd need to see month by month ratings for late-78 to at least mid-79 to verify any of this.  

 

Edited by Neil Johnson
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, John said:

Regarding The Maggie recasts in 1995:

 

I know Robyn Griggs was photographed with John Wayne Bobbit so AW fired her

 

Jodi Lyn O'Keefe was only 16/17 at the time so maybe age got her fired. She began Nash Bridges soon After

 

Lisa Brenner was there a year & was written off due to story right?

 

My understanding was that Robyn Griggs was generally difficult and it wasn't just one innocent interaction with Bobbitt that got her fired. She was there for nearly 2 years. I liked her in the role though.

 

Jodi Lyn O'Keefe was on until November 1995. The first episode of Nash Bridges aired March 29, 1996. It seems more likely that O'Keefe quit AW to work on Nash Bridges than she was fired from AW and subsequently hired immediately on Nash Bridges which would have needed some time to film, edit etc. before airing.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Neil Johnson said:

And regarding the ratings, it's been my understanding AW was #1 in the ratings during the Sven storyline, and then settled to #2 after that plot concluded.  Then stayed at #2 until March when the show expanded to 90-minutes and the ratings plunged to number 8.  It was said at the time that AW lost half of its audience because of the 90-minute expansion.  I supposed we'd need to see month by month ratings for late-78 to at least mid-79 to verify any of this.

 

If that's true, then P&G and/or NBC should have realized right away that the expansion was a mistake and cut AW back to sixty minutes as soon as possible.  The fact that they didn't proves just how grossly incompetent and indifferent TPTB were.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Checking the Ratings from the 70's thread, there are some ratings from early 79 indicating that AW was already out of the top 5 when the 90 min expansion took place.

The Sven storyline wrapped up by Feb 78 and AW began to drift down during 78 as GH gained momentum and GL was strong on the back of its expansion in late 77.

Anyway, I suggest posters check out the ratings thread for more details.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Neil Johnson said:

 

The episode in which John Randolph saved Alice and then died in the fire was actually the second 90-minute episode, March 6, 1979.  The first was March 5, and as I recall, it heavily featured Mac and Rachel.  

 

There's some shaky audio at Eddie Drueding's channel.

 

 

18 hours ago, teplin said:

 

Rachel "killing" Mitch and going on trial – earning Doug Watson an Emmy in the process -- and then going to prison before busting out to track Mitch down was riveting to me as a kid. But in retrospect, yeah, it didn't do the show or the characters any favors. 

 

I have to admit I'm not that into falsely accused/trial stories most of the time, so that probably didn't help, but I think it was the leadup to the trial that may have soured me. It just felt very lifeless to me. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Khan said:

 

If that's true, then P&G and/or NBC should have realized right away that the expansion was a mistake and cut AW back to sixty minutes as soon as possible.  The fact that they didn't proves just how grossly incompetent and indifferent TPTB were.

 

This is around the time that Fred Silverman took over as president of NBC.  In primetime, NBC was a disaster ratings wise.   There were few primetime hits on NBC.  I guess they figured that AW was their highest rated daytime program and turning it into 90 minutes, regardless of the ratings, would still turn a profit.  Back when there were only 3 networks, the networks would use their advertising revenue from daytime to fund their nighttime pilots.

 

I agree that AW should have been reduced back to 60 minutes as soon as possible and returned to its 3 PM start time.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/21/2020 at 4:23 PM, Efulton said:

I read an interview with Beverlee where she said her female screen partner  on AW always had to have the last word in every scene with her. She made this woman sound petty, insecure and competitive. Beverlee did not name the actress.  

 

There's a clip on YouTube of Grant Aleksander relating this story/these words of wisdom Beverlee McKinsey shared with him during their GL days.

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Khan said:

 

If that's true, then P&G and/or NBC should have realized right away that the expansion was a mistake and cut AW back to sixty minutes as soon as possible.  The fact that they didn't proves just how grossly incompetent and indifferent TPTB were.

Lemay said in his book that even though he felt that taking the show to 90 minutes was a mistake, they had already invested too much money in the project and taking it back to 60 minutes would have resulted in great economic loss. But judging by the full 90 minute episodes that are available on YT, they did seem to get a little better over time. There was a lot less padding then there was in the March 6th episode lol

Granted, there's only 4 full 90 minute episodes on YT, but I liked them. 

Edited by AbcNbc247
Link to post
Share on other sites

I would have done a 90 minute episode on special occasions.  Edge of night did one..and it was well regarded.

 

I think doing it daily would wear on the writers and actors...and viewers.

Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, Soaplovers said:

I think doing it daily would wear on the writers and actors...and viewers.

 

Totally. 90 minutes with no intermission is a popular runtime for plays, for both audiences and actors, and that's after at least a month of rehearsal. 90 minutes 5x/week sounds absolutely draining for the professionals, and tedious for the audience... like glorified background noise while one carries on household duties.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, SFK said:

 

There's a clip on YouTube of Grant Aleksander relating this story/these words of wisdom Beverlee McKinsey shared with him during their GL days.

Maybe there is where I remember it from!

Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Paul Raven said:

Checking the Ratings from the 70's thread, there are some ratings from early 79 indicating that AW was already out of the top 5 when the 90 min expansion took place.

The Sven storyline wrapped up by Feb 78 and AW began to drift down during 78 as GH gained momentum and GL was strong on the back of its expansion in late 77.

Anyway, I suggest posters check out the ratings thread for more details.

Hi Paul, Thank you for verifying that.  That was my understanding too.  AW was already declining prior to the 90 min episodes.  In fact, I think it went from like #2 to #8 in just a few weeks.  I guess my question is still, why?  Harding Lemay left pretty fast too once the 90 mins episodes started.  I am sure he was burned out but he had to have know in late 78 in early 79 that that show was decliing in ratings.  I think he is a very proud writer and kind of egotisical that he wanted to bail knowing the show was heading in a downward spiral but the irony is, the storylines, production, acting, etc was consistent with the previous successful months and years with high ratings.  NBC, P&G and Rauch response to fix this issue was to create a new show,  Rauch was so successful with AW I am sure the network thought it was a great idea at the time.  GH had become such a big success and a completely different kind of drama than AW was and honestly believe Lemay knew that and decided it was time to retire from the show.  As much as I loved his stories, I still think if he remained on the show for the early 80's, AW would have still remained low in the ratings.  Just my thoughts!   

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, SFK said:

90 minutes with no intermission is a popular runtime for plays, for both audiences and actors, and that's after at least a month of rehearsal. 90 minutes 5x/week sounds absolutely draining for the professionals, and tedious for the audience... like glorified background noise while one carries on household duties.

 

Agree!  And God help us if the 90 minute shows had somehow been successful.  Because, before you'd know it, NBC would have expanded AW to 120 minutes, then 150, then who knows how long.  It could have been like watching TODAY, but with one long-ass, all-day soap opera.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   1 member

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy