Jump to content
Toups

AMC Tribute Thread

Recommended Posts

4 minutes ago, Donna B said:

Report post

Posted 1 hour ago

Dedication

     I dedicate this book to my beautiful mother, who was still fighting the good fight after the completion of this memoir, Mom, you lost that fight, but the presence of your indomitable spirit, love, and humor, will live in my heart forever. I know the trials and tribulations you endured both as a child and as a woman. This is because my entrance into this world, and the experiences of your life, were so akin, to and intertwined with yours. It created a very strong dynamic between the two of us, which throughout the years, often caused our relationship to be strained and contentious.

     It took a long time for me to understand and accept the woman you were, only because it took me that long to understand and accept the woman I became, holding on to my fears for almost a lifetime. But it's not a cliche that it's the difficult times that makes us stronger and give us a clearer perception.

     My perception of you in both our lives became quite clear, Mom. You loved me every secoind with every morsel of your being, and never wanted me to make the same mistakes you had. I finally recognize how hard you had to work in order to persevere and maintain your sense of dignity and grace through all your adversity. I have the deepest respect, admiration, and love for you Mother. You are and will always remain my champion.

In Memory of Lora Morgan May 22, 2014

 

Members

1,128 posts

Report post

Posted 27 minutes ago

Preface

     I can still remember that magical day sitting on the floor of director John Erman's living room. Only inches away from me was the legendary Henry Fonda, and across from him, perched daintily on the sofa, the great Olivia de Havilland. Filling out the rest of the room, draped across chairs and settled comfortably on the floor, were Georg Stanford Brown, Lynne Moody, Richard Thomas, Marc Singer, Fay Hauser, Greg Morris, Brian Stokes Mitchell, and little ole' me. I was about to embark on one of the greatest roles of my burgeoning  career, and one of the most historical events in television history: Roots: The Next Generations.

What does this have to do with All My Children?

 

That you have now posted twice?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Preface, 2

     I sat wide-eyed, at the feet of the brilliant author, Alex Haley, as he shared with us his fascinating story of his family's history. Alex shared that, as a child, he would listen from the doorway as his elders gathered on the porch reciting tales of the old African, Kunta Kinte, being taken from his village and brought to this strange land called America, where he was stripped of his dignity, culture, security, and humanness, and forced to live as a slave.

     Because we were preparing for Roots 2, Alex spoke mostly of Kunta's offspring, and how the African had left his mark of strength and perseverance. The later generations of family that followed would become educated, fight to vote, go off to college, build their own homes, have their own businesses, and one would even become one of the world's most prolific authors. There would be many great achievements from the Kinte lineage The old African would have been proud to know that all his suffering had not been in vain.

     Alex told us one of the most daunting, yet rewarding, journeys each of us could ever take, would be to travel back down the road our ancestors had paved for us. He implored us to question older members of our families to discover our own family histories, no matter what we unearthed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Donna B said:

Preface, 2

     I sat wide-eyed, at the feet of the brilliant author, Alex Haley, as he shared with us his fascinating story of his family's history. Alex shared that, as a child, he would listen from the doorway as his elders gathered on the porch reciting tales of the old African, Kunta Kinte, being taken from his village and brought to this strange land called America, where he was stripped of his dignity, culture, security, and humanness, and forced to live as a slave.

     Because we were preparing for Roots 2, Alex spoke mostly of Kunta's offspring, and how the African had left his mark of strength and perseverance. The later generations of family that followed would become educated, fight to vote, go off to college, build their own homes, have their own businesses, and one would even become one of the world's most prolific authors. There would be many great achievements from the Kinte lineage The old African would have been proud to know that all his suffering had not been in vain.

     Alex told us one of the most daunting, yet rewarding, journeys each of us could ever take, would be to travel back down the road our ancestors had paved for us. He implored us to question older members of our families to discover our own family histories, no matter what we unearthed.

 

With all due respect, what does this have to do with All My Children

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

She's having a laugh at our expense at this rate. Isn't she?

 

Like... This is an elaborate joke. Right? This can't be real. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, ~bl~ said:

I'm guessing that is part of Debbi Morgan's memoir. 

 

6 minutes ago, ~bl~ said:

I'm guessing that is part of Debbi Morgan's memoir. 

 

6 minutes ago, ~bl~ said:

I'm guessing that is part of Debbi Morgan's memoir. 

{3 minutes ago, ~bl~ said:

{I'm guessing that is part of Debbi Morgan's memoir.

 

Yes, you are right. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Donna, you were doing okay in the GL thread for a minute and then you go and pull this. 
 

Please keep your postings to actual conversation and engagement with other posters!

 

My apologies to everyone else for this post that also has nothing to do with AMC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a little bit more to the memoir's Preface (part of a page) and then it begins on Chapter 1, which is only 5 pages long.  I'll put it to the side for now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

image.png

Susan Lucci said she was literally shocked & blindsided by the cancellation. She really did not see it coming. And, she blamed Frons, which makes all the sense in the world.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Donna B said:

There is a little bit more to the memoir's Preface (part of a page) and then it begins on Chapter 1, which is only 5 pages long.  I'll put it to the side for now.

we dont want to see this book 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, AdamNewmanFan said:

we dont want to see this book 

You don't have to worry your poor little self about seeing it. I won't be showing it to to you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...