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Newsweek to end print editions-going online only


dragonflies

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Newspaper and magazines are a dying format and have been for years. With the internet, they have been made irrelevant. Everything you can get in a magazine can be found on the internet faster, more conveniently, not to mention easier. "News" is not really news by the time it makes it to print bc. Plus with more and more people using their tablets, laptops and phones to read books and similar digital content, it makes sense to make this transition, especially when there really isnt the money to be found printing paper

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Is there anything positive out there in the world Carl? wink.png

With the news media, not much. Elsewhere, sometimes. But we can remember these covers with fondness.

http://www.politico.com/gallery/2012/10/tina-browns-famous-newsweek-covers/000489-006688.html

The main reason I disliked Newsweek is because of the glib way they cover serious issues. I don't read Time very often but when I do, they seem to take it a little more seriously.

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Newspaper and magazines are a dying format and have been for years. With the internet, they have been made irrelevant. Everything you can get in a magazine can be found on the internet faster

I don't want fast all the time. The joy on the Sunday NY Times is being able to plunk it down in all it's huge glory and just spend an hour or so reading in peace from section to section, finding things that interest you that you had no idea interested you. You start out reading the headline on Page 1, and eventually you are skimming the Arts section and wind up for no reason whatsoever reading what is new in Homes, and you aren't even shopping for a home. Then you get to Sports or whatever. When I buy the NY Times or Post daily, I pretty much read them cover to cover. That 20 minutes of peace is something to look for, not throw away because I can get all necessary information in 10 minutes elsewhere.

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I don't want fast all the time. The joy on the Sunday NY Times is being able to plunk it down in all it's huge glory and just spend an hour or so reading in peace from section to section, finding things that interest you that you had no idea interested you. You start out reading the headline on Page 1, and eventually you are skimming the Arts section and wind up for no reason whatsoever reading what is new in Homes, and you aren't even shopping for a home. Then you get to Sports or whatever. When I buy the NY Times or Post daily, I pretty much read them cover to cover. That 20 minutes of peace is something to look for, not throw away because I can get all necessary information in 10 minutes elsewhere.

I get that but unfortunately its 2012 and this is the way the world and technology is moving in. Im sure sales played a big role in this decision bc if more people like you were still buying the print version, it would still be around. Thats not the case though as more people have become more reliant and apt to get their information on the internet instead of going to the store and buying a mag/newspaper

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There was probably a point in time where Newsweek was informative and it might still be to an extent. Technology is like this blessing and curse rolled up into one. Sure it's making a lot more things accessible and making them accessible at phenomenal speeds. It's also contributing in a major way to the "dumbifcation" of society and I'm going to guess that the West will get dumber at a much more rapid rate than the East which has to stay smart enough to mass produce this technology.

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The sad part about the online community is the absence of the newspaper. Magazines are all online now, in fact I finally moved my final magazine subscription online, National Geographic. But while the NYT and Washington Post and Chicago Tribune, etc.. all have online viewing of the paper(not condensed by the way)' there is something special about curling up with the Sunday paper with a hot cup of coffee and spending hours reading every morsel of it.

I also think the things that get missed in the online venue are the special interest pieces, the local articles, those little gems that are hidden among the so called "big" news stories along with local columnists. I used to loved reading Mike Roykos columns everyday in the paper. He was a local journalist who lived and and breathed Chicago and his writing always had a tone of irony to it. Mostly as a Chicagoan, I felt he was speaking of things he actually saw and experienced himself. For all the talk about targeted news sites and on demand and up to the minute, the personal touch exhibited by that kind of writing has been replaced by mean spirited "Internet" columnists.

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