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Radio Soap Opera Discussion

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adrnyc   
6 hours ago, vetsoapfan said:

 

One Man's Family was amazing!

Hmmmm. Alright - I'll have to give that one a go once I finish Hearts In Harmony (or give up on Aunt Mary)

 

6 hours ago, slick jones said:

I have casts for both the Radio and television  (OMF) versions. It will take some time to track down, but I'll put them both up this week.

Thanks!

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On 7/17/2017 at 10:01 PM, adrnyc said:

I have been listening to a radio soap for almost a year now - Hearts In Harmony - and I absolutely love it. I'm just over half way through the episodes that exist. 

 

Does anyone know where I can find any info on HIH? I've done an internet search and can't really find anything. I'm fascinated to know more about the serial. When I first started listening, the characters would sing a song at the piano every other episode and then one day I realized it hadn't happened for several weeks - and it never happened again. Why did they change the format? How many years did the show run? Questions, questions, questions.

 

I've also started listening to Aunt Mary but I don't enjoy it nearly as much. I'm having a very hard time becoming involved in the story. 

 

Anyway, should anyone have a tip on how to find more info, I'd appreciate the help!

We Love Soaps has just posted a summary of the July  17th ep of HIH

1946: On syndicated radio soap opera Hearts in Harmony, Steve Parker and his fiancee Penny took a drive through the countryside around Rossville just a few days before their wedding.  Meanwhile, Jed told Johnny the FBI may be investigating Parker Industries. Hearts in Harmony premiered in 1941, and was sponsored by the Kroger grocery store chain.

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adrnyc   
1 hour ago, Paul Raven said:

We Love Soaps has just posted a summary of the July  17th ep of HIH

1946: On syndicated radio soap opera Hearts in Harmony, Steve Parker and his fiancee Penny took a drive through the countryside around Rossville just a few days before their wedding.  Meanwhile, Jed told Johnny the FBI may be investigating Parker Industries. Hearts in Harmony premiered in 1941, and was sponsored by the Kroger grocery store chain.

 

Thanks! I actually saw that last year when they posted it - it's what originally caused me to search for HiH. I can't believe I've been listening to it for a year - I listen every morning while I walk the dogs. :)

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A summary of Right to Happiness from the book 'Tune in Yesterday'.If anyone would like to request a radio soap.I'll post the extract from the book.

 

The Right to Happiness, one of Irna Phillips' four major daytime serials, first heard on NBC Blue October 16, 1939, evolved from The Guiding Light when Miss Phillips transplanted Rose Kransky from Light into the new format. But The Right to Happiness soon became the story of Carolyn Allen, a magazine editor's daughter whose search for a "God-given right to happiness" led her through four husbands, a prison sentence, and hours of anguish at the hands of her rebellious RIN-TIN-TIN 513 son Skip.

Early in the run, Carolyn Allen became the wife of Bill Walker, a self-centered man who proved himself "capable of anything." She killed him with a pistol in an accident that police called murder, and endured four months of legal maneuvering and trial. Later, Carolyn Allen Walker married Dwight Kramer, a union foredoomed by the fickle nature of both. Son Skip, born while she was incarcerated in the state penitentiary, would become her greatest source of joy and pain, but that was still far in the future.

 

Carolyn Allen Walker Kramer was to marry again, this time Governor Miles Nelson, who brought political intrigue into the plot. That marriage too gradually trickled downhill. Finally Carolyn Allen Walker Kramer Nelson settled down with Lee MacDonald, a handsome, brilliant lawyer. With that marriage, her time was up. The serial expired November 25, 1960, before Carolyn could tire of Lee and move on to other marital pastures. It faded out with the two of them securely wrapped in each other's arms and Carolyn explaining her philosophy that "we are all born with the right to happiness."

 

For twenty-one years this show came packaged to the theme, "Song of the Soul." Miss Phillips sold The Right to Happiness to an agency in 1942; it was moved from Chicago to New York, and John M. Young was selected to write it after a writing contest had been conducted by the agency to find Miss Phillips' successor. Eloise Kummer was the original Carolyn in Chicago; Claudia Morgan took over in New York and finished the role. Gary Merrill and John Larkin played Miles Nelson. Dick Wells and David Gothard were among those who played Dwight Kramer. Reese Taylor was the ill-tempered, ill-fated Bill Walker. Ruth Bailey played Rose Kransky, as she had on The Guiding Light. Procter & Gamble was the longtime sponsor. For the bulk of its run, The Right to Happiness was an NBC show; it moved to CBS in its final days.

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Life Can Be Beautiful

Life Can Be Beautiful had a plot that couldn't fail. Carol Conrad was young, afraid, and alone; a product of the big -town slums and not yet out of her teens. Seeking shelter, she found it with one of the grand old philosophers of daytime radio. For on that day-September 5, 1938-Carol found Papa David Solomon, owner of the Slightly Read Bookshop, and began her new life as his ward. With the new life came a new name. Carol became the fiery, impetuous "Chichi," girl of the streets. Seeking a hiding place from Gyp Mendoza, the neighborhood bully, she was taken in by kindly old Papa David, who let her sleep on a pallet in the back room of his store. The pallet became a bed; the back room became Chichi's room, and for the next fifteen years she and Papa David shared their lives, troubles, and adventures.

 

That was the beginning of Life Can Be Beautiful, "an inspiring message of faith drawn from life, written by Carl Bixby and Don Becker and brought to you by Spic And Span." As she grew up, Chichi became a daughter to the old man. Her life, and the men in it, became the great concern of Papa David:s last years. That was why Papa David must have been particularly gratified when Chichi decided to marry Stephen Hamilton. Stephen was like a son to Papa David. A hopeless cripple, he too had been taken in by the kindly old book dealer. Papa David had given Stephen a job in the Slightly Read Bookstore when no one else would hire him. Chichi was impressed by Stephen's intellect, amazed that she could be loved by a man so much greater than she. A long -running romance was triggered; Stephen was partly cured of his paralysis through an amazing operation, then lost his legs in a later accident. Some listeners began clamoring for marriage. Bixby and Becker yielded to the outcry. Chichi and Stephen were married. Almost immediately, the writers realized their mistake. Stephen was like a millstone around her neck. So after involving him with another woman and getting him entangled in a jewel heist, they killed him off with a heart attack. Stephen, one of the great sympathy characters of daytime radio, turned blackheart at the end. Even Chichi's baby died, the result of pneumonia caught when Stephen foolishly took him out unprotected in the rain. Chichi, free again, became one of the most eligible singles of the matinee airwaves. The one consistent man in her life, her "chum from the streets" Toby Nelson, loved her passionately but without hope. Toby was just her pal (she was always "Cheech" to him), a shoulder to cry on when things got too tough. He was around for most of the run, disappearing to Korea a couple of years before the serial was dropped in 1954

 

. Life Can Be Beautiful was one of the best -loved of radio's soaps. To the actors who worked on it, the show became known by its first letters, LCBB, which translated over the years into the pet name "Elsie Beebe." Ralph Locke went all the way as Papa David, and died soon after the show left the air. Alice Reinheart played Chichi for the first eight years, and then the part was taken by Teri Keane, who finished it. Toby was Carl Eastman. Stephen Hamilton was first played by John Holbrook, later by Earl Larrimore. Becker and Bixby shared the writing duties, each taking over for several weeks at a time and working out their plots by telephone. They began each show with some piece of heavy philosophy: for example, "John Ruskin wrote this: 'Whenever money is the principal object of life, it is both got ill and spent ill, and does harm both in getting and spending. When getting and spending happiness is our aim, life can be beautiful.' " And "Longfellow expressed the opinion that the Sabbath is the golden clasp that binds together the volume of the week . . . By the way, how long has it been since you've been to church, where you'll find new assurances that life can be beautiful. . . ?" Despite the tearstained plots, Becker and Bixby thought of their serial as a beam of hope in a dark world. It proved-they told Time in 1953-that, "however dark the world, this too will pass."

Edited by Paul Raven

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