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1996


Toups

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March 29, 1996

Created by

Agnes Nixon

Executive Producer

Susan Bedsow Horgan

Directed by

Jill Mitwell

Written by

Michael Malone

Jean Passanante

Peggy Sloane

Richard Backus

Ethel Brez

Lloyd Gold

Becky Cole

David Cherrill

Mike Cohen

Lisa Connor

Neal Bell

Supervising Producers

Leslie Kwartin

Robyn Goodman

Coordinating Producer

Ellen Novack

Associate Producer

Mary-Kelly Rodden

Scenic Designer

Roger Mooney

Costume Designer

Susan Gammie

Associate Directors

Jim Sayegh

Tracy Casper Lang

Scott Riggs

Stage Managers

Raymond J. Hoesten

Alan Needlemen

Production Assistants

Maude Bickner

Suzanne Flynn

Diane Rodriguez

-------------------------------------------

September 27, 1996

Executive Producer

Susan Bedsow Horgan

Directed by

Lonny Price

Written by

Jean Passanante

Leah Laiman

Peggy Sloane

Richard Backus

Ethel Brez

Gordon Rayfield

Lloyd Gold

Becky Cole

David Cherrill

Neal Bell

Michael Quinn

Supervising Producer

Robyn Goodman

Producer

Ellen Novack

Coordinating Producer

Mary-Kelly Rodden

Scenic Designer

Roger Mooney

Costume Designer

Susan Gammie

Casting Director

Sonia Nikore, CSA

Associate Directors

Jim Sayegh

Scott Riggs

Danielle Faraldo

Stuart Silver

Stage Managers

Raymond J. Hoesten

Alan Needlemen

Technical Directors

Henry Enrico Ferro

Bob J. Shinn

Music Directors

Jamie Howarth

Paul S. Glass

Music Produced & Arranged By

David Nichtern

Original Music By

David Nichtern

Lee Holdridge

Theme By

Lee Holdridge

David Nichtern

-------------------------------------------

Created by

Agnes Nixon

Executive Producer

Maxine Levinson

Directed by

Casey Childs

Written by

Peggy Sloane

Jean Passanante

Leah Laiman

Richard Backus

Ethel Brez

Gordon Rayfield

Anna Theresa Cascio

Lloyd Gold

Becky Cole

David Cherrill

Neal Bell

Michael Quinn

David Smilow

Supervising Producer

Robyn Goodman

Producer

Ellen Novack

Coordinating Producer

Mary-Kelly Weir

Associate Producer

Laura B. Goldberg

Scenic Designer

Roger Mooney

Associate Directors

Danielle Faraldo

Suzanne Flynn

Jay Millard

-------------------------------------------

December 24, 1996 - Christmas Closing

Created by

Agnes Nixon

Executive Producer

Maxine Levinson

Directed by

Jim Sayegh

Jill Mitwell

David Pressman

Lonny Price

Frank Valentini

Casey Childs

Bruce Cooperman

Joe Cotugno

Jim Depaiva

Gary Tomlin

Written by

Leah Laiman

Jean Passanante

Peggy Sloane

Richard Backus

Ethel Brez

Gordon Rayfield

Anna Theresa Cascio

Lloyd Gold

Becky Cole

David Cherrill

Neal Bell

Michael Quinn

David Smilow

Cassandra Medley

Mike Cohen

Supervising Producer

Robyn Goodman

Producer

Ellen Novack

Coordinating Producer

Mary-Kelly Weir

Associate Producer

Laura B. Goldberg

Scenic Designer

Roger Mooney

Costume Designer

Susan Gammie

Casting Director

Sonia Nikore, C.S.A.

Associate Directors

Danielle Faraldo

Suzanne Flynn

Jay Millard

Owen Renfroe

Lighting Directors

Scott Devitte

Michael Thornburgh

Technical Directors

Henry Enrico Ferro

Bob J. Shinn

Music Directors

Jamie Howarth

Paul S. Glass

Music Produced & Arranged By

David Nichtern

Original Music By

David Nichtern

Lee Holdridge

Theme Music By

Lee Holdridge

David Nichtern

Stage Managers

Raymond J. Hoesten

Alan Needleman

Production Assistants

Maude Bickner

Jennifer Pepperman

Production Manager

Patricia Nesbitt

Vivian Ramos

Technical Manager

Edward Cirri

Video

Clark F. Grain Jr, SVO

Camera Operators

Bruce Cooperman

Reggie Drakeford

Frank Forsyth

Larry Strack

Howie Zeidman

Baron Bonet

Joe Digennaro

Jim Heneghan

Calros Rios

Tommy Tucker

Audio

Michael Goldberg

Richard Sloan

Boom Operators

Joe Sapienza

Robert Theodore

Jerry Zeller

Audio Post-Production

Jonathan Lory

Hesh Yarmark

R.T. Smith

David Smith

Sound Effects Post-Production

Glen Heil

Assistant Scenic Designers

John C. Kenny Jr

Ruth A. Wells

Scenic Artists

Robert Dell

Anne Stuhler

Fred Sammut

Norman Davidson

Karla Bailey

Ly Van Munlyn

Tom Greenfield

Siena Porta

Vladimir Lagransky

Emil Pilisov

Uri Ibragimov

Associate Casting Directors

Victoria Visgilio

Venetia Reece

Associate Costume Designer

Daniel Lawson

Assistant Costume Designer

Laura Drawbaugh

Wardrobe

Gwyn Martin

Lancey Clough

Joe Dehn

Lara Greene

Joy Holdsworth

Wendy Parker

Crisy Richmond

Makeup Artists

Renate Long

Dennis Eger

Miriam Meth

Hair Stylists

Karen Treubig

Wayne Bilotti

Laurie Filippi

Videotape Editors

Leona K. Zeira

Artie Volk

Denise Kaufman

Trudy Gonzalez

Eileen Clancy

Cathy Isabella

George Schifini

Post Production Coordinator

Margo Husin Call

Assistant to the Executive Producer

Jennifer Rosen

Writers Assistants

Ron Carlivati

Tracey Mitchel

Production Associate

Diane Rodriguez

Assistant to the Directors

Teresa Anne Cicala

Technical Maintenance

Hollis Bostic

Charles Ranzanici

Dave Taylor

r.f. Audio

Jerry Cudmore

Business Manager

Sandra Frayer

Studio Coordinators

Joanna St. Aubyn

Linda Burstion

Script Typist

Denise Hidalgo

Hand Propertyman

Robert Leonido

Propertymen

Anthony Iovino

Floyd Miclo

Steve Miller

Jim Augello

Marc Turner

Mike Vega

Jim Johnson

Mike Weckerle

Rich Massella

Mike McHugh

David Miclo

Don Zingaro

Dan Yannantuono

Russell Meciones

Renato Moncini

Ken Malone, Jr.

Mike Hutzler

Oustide Propertymen

Larry Lutz

Chris Kavanaugh

Head Electrician

Glenn M. Angelino

Electrician

Joe Colagreco

Fred Ostrow

Dewey Bratton

Paul Gallagher

Curt Sweeney

Michael Linn

Mike Malone

Richard Griffin

Robet Griffin

Tommy Caso

John Greenfield

Gary Wilner

Stan Bernstein

Ron Kirtland

Paul Caso

Mike Stein

Willie Neville

Robert Terzi

David Weir

Head Carpenter

Joseph W. Giordano

Carpenters

John Giordano

John Rivard

Kenny Malone

Erick Griffenkranz

Jorge Carpio

Jerry Brennan

Mike Sullivan

Charles Campbell

John Abbruzzese

Peter Bentz

Joseph W. Giordano Jr.

Electronic Graphics

Linda R. Badamo

Barbara Gill

Security and Building Staff

David Coleman

Hassan Abdulsamad

Ariel Santoni

Chetram Sukhram

Luke Murillo

Louie Vazquez

Wilson Severa

Furs Provided By

Christie Brothers

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