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Khalil re signs with Y&R


rlj

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But if I were to pose the question to a room full of black female viewers if they felt that CK's Lily was an accurate portrayal of the young professional black women that they were or knew, the cumulative eye rolls would tilt the earth.

Really and I'd bet these experts are the same fools complaining about Gabby's hair.

There is a rhythm in which many black people speak

And on the flip side some of us don't speak with any rhythm at all.

As with most things, it really just depends on where and how you grew up.

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As an AA who attended a black college, the whole "black speak" is def ignorant. It reminds me of a Chris Rock bit he did about Colin Powell and how people always used to state "oh he speaks so well" and Chris stated "as opposed to what?"

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I'm too lazy to rea dthse short essay replies. I will just says as a black woman I look at CK's Lily and don't see a black women and yes I have met quite a few black girls with that valley girl drawl as well as quite a few hispanic girls with that drawl. It annoys me on any and everyone.

Like it or not you grow up resembling bits and pieces of your parents and her Lily doesn't resembler either person who raised her even a little bit.

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I'm too lazy to rea dthse short essay replies. I will just says as a black woman I look at CK's Lily and don't see a black women and yes I have met quite a few black girls with that valley girl drawl as well as quite a few hispanic girls with that drawl. It annoys me on any and everyone.

Like it or not you grow up resembling bits and pieces of your parents and her Lily doesn't resembler either person who raised her even a little bit.

+1.

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Like it or not you grow up resembling bits and pieces of your parents and her Lily doesn't resembler either person who raised her even a little bit.

This may be true for some people but it's also quite the contrary for others.

I know kids who grew up in households where both parents had heavy accents (Jamaican, Chinese, Vietnamese, Mexican, Honduran, etc) and those kids spoke English without a trace of their parents' accents and no one would probably guess that some of their parents don't speak a word of English.

I don't resemble my parents in any way and I'm not the only oddity.

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This may be true for some people but it's also quite the contrary for others.

I know kids who grew up in households where both parents had heavy accents (Jamaican, Chinese, Vietnamese, Mexican, Honduran, etc) and those kids spoke English without a trace of their parents' accents and no one would probably guess that some of their parents don't speak a word of English.

I don't resemble my parents in any way and I'm not the only oddity.

I'm not talking even about having a parents accent because neither of my parents are American and I don't have even a sligth hint of their accent. I'm talking about personality traits. Like it or not you get some of your personality traits from the people who raised you. Maybe you don't see the resemblance of your parents in yourself but I'm sure others do.

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And on the flip side some of us don't speak with any rhythm at all.

As with most things, it really just depends on where and how you grew up.

Absolutely. But why does daytime shy away from those who do? Maybe I'm just being selfish and self-serving. I love the medium of soap opera, I love great slice of life drama, I love to feel like I'm watching a great little Off-Broadway play on television. And when I think of my black family, the type of people whose lives I'd love to see dramatized on screen, I just don't see and hear them on soaps as often as I'd love to.

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As an AA who attended a black college, the whole "black speak" is def ignorant. It reminds me of a Chris Rock bit he did about Colin Powell and how people always used to state "oh he speaks so well" and Chris stated "as opposed to what?"

I totally understand that, but I think people's mind are going to the extreme examples here. I'm not talking about black characters being written with a bunch of slang-laden yo-yo-yo buffoonery. I'm talking about how a black woman on soaps will most likely sound like Lisa Bonet rather than Erika Alexander.

It doesn't get much more elegant than Phylicia Rashad. Hear her voice and you know you're hearing a very elegant woman who happens to be black. That's all I'm saying. The southern black upbringing you hear in her voice isn't a crime, it doesn't make her sound ignorant, it's who she is. And I think a lot of people in television would rather cast a black character with someone who sounds like CK.

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So what if Tiger Woods or any other biracial or multi-racial person who is dark, doesn't want to be seen as black? Why should they have deny all the other things that make them up just to please the black gatekeepers of who can be black and what is required outside of your skin to make you black? I only see this is as a problem when they are ashamed of having any black ancestors.

Well, first I'd tell Tiger to avoid all mirrors, pictures of his father, and the outside world. tongue.png But seriously, all bi-/multiracial people have the right to acknowledge their full heritage. As a first generation biracial person who had a very even upbringing, I always identified as biracial. I have friends (and know of celebrities) who grew up similarly, but only identify as black. That's their choice, though I disagree with it. I really don't care about what "the world" has to say with its one dropism and all that, I will not disrespect myself, nor my father and his loving family that raised me by denying half of who I am. I just don't see how a biracial person raised by a single white mother won't claim to be half white, but that's their business.

Honestly, this conversation shouldn't even be an issue. Ditch that high yella trick and recast with Shannon Kane. Problem. Solved.

Thank you! biggrin.png

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Speaking with a particular accent or dialect, which I referred to as "black vernacular" (http://en.wikipedia....nacular_English) in my previous post, does not constitute ignorance. Perhaps I should preface... I am a biracial man who had a very well-rounded upbringing by a black mother and a white father, and I was surrounded by my extended families on both sides. Many of my black relatives speak with a black sound characteristic of the Mid-Atlantic region, and they are far from poorly educated. No more so than a white person from New Orleans or Atlanta who might unfairly be dubbed a yokel for their Southern drawl. Grow up in a black family, live and work with black people in New York, Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., Maryland, Virginia, the Carolinas, Florida, Texas... the majority of black women do not sound like Karla Mosley.

My point is, daytime would rather cast in that direction.

It's not about neck rolling, it's not about teeth sucking, it's not about using words like "bootylicious". When my mother called me and I picked up the phone, my girlfriend would comment on how my voice/speech changed, almost like when she spoke to her mother in Spanish over the phone. If we can accept that Carlotta and Cristian or Tea's conversations took on a different tone, why is it so hard to accept that black people can and do speak differently without getting into a conversation about black stereotypes? Is there ONE way to be black? Absolutely not. But if I were to pose the question to a room full of black female viewers if they felt that CK's Lily was an accurate portrayal of the young professional black women that they were or knew, the cumulative eye rolls would tilt the earth.

. There is a rhythm in which many black people speak and their OLTL dialogue writers were not always in tune with that rhythm, and consequently, their dialogue sounded artificial and stilted at times. Ellen Bethea, Sandra Grant, REG, Tika Sumpter, Kearran Giovanni, they didn't have this issue, and those are the black females you will most likely see in daytime, which imo has EVERYthing to do with TPTB thinking this "type" of black is more "palatable" to the general audience.

I agree with a lot of the points that you are making SFK especially the things I bolded. A lot of black people as well as people in other cultures do have a lot of similar characterisitics/mannerisms, etc... Sometimes it will be a lot of people in one geographical area, like a lot of people in the South. And sometimes there are people in different regions that also share similar characteristics. I don't anyone is saying there is only one way to be black or all black people are expected to sound and act a certain a way.

Or that some biracial people/multi-racial people have to showcase any "blackness" in them and all the other stuff I saw in some of these posts. There are some biracial people that will claim one part of their racial makeup more than the other parts.There are some that will really one claim one part of their racial makeup. There are some that will all the races that make them up equally. People can and will do what they want in regards to stuff like that. I see this happen with some actors in Hollywood.

And nobody is saying that all black people all the same, because that isn't true. But a lot of black people share similar characteristics/mannerisms, speech patterns, etc. And I don't it's ignorant to say that, it's the truth. Just like a lot of people who are Hispanic, Asian, and White also share similar traits. I think that the different traits we see displayed in the different cultures, makes things interesting and shows how unique we can be as people.

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I think we're almost right there in terms of trying to resist this. We differ on the term "African-American" which I will shout at the top of my lungs whenever, wherever is a useless term to me. . How many black people looked at the last three in Destiny's Child and shot down Kelly Rowlands and Michelle Williams in favor of Beyonce (who claims for some idiotic L'Oreal ad that her skin tone comes from being Native-American, Creole and "African-American") as if we could not find women who will only claim to be black with that same skin tone.

lol at the part in bold. I know some people do get annoyed at people using the term African-American to label black people. Not all black people ancestors are from Africa, but I understand the need for a lot black people to try and understand where they came from.I definitely get that. On the flip side I think it's somewhat amusing that when sometimes some white people will label list every european nationality to describe their race. When race is brought up, instead of just saying they are white they will say they are Scottish, French, Irish, English, etc... There is nothing wrong with them talking about their hertiage or where they/their families are from, but as far as race goes they are still white, lol. In fact I think there was another Loreal commerical, where a white actress/model was talking about how being something like Austrailian, Irish, Scottish,(something like that) etc, made up the color of her skin tone. I also find it amusing when some people say things like they are 1/38th Native American.(Yeah, I'm exaggerating, but people know that I mean). And couldn't that be anybody, really? When those things are said sometimes, I find that amusing.

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I'm not talking even about having a parents accent because neither of my parents are American and I don't have even a sligth hint of their accent. I'm talking about personality traits. Like it or not you get some of your personality traits from the people who raised you. Maybe you don't see the resemblance of your parents in yourself but I'm sure others do.

If I didn't look just a little bit like my mother, they'd keep swearing that they brought the wrong baby home. I've got none of their personality traits. No one's ever lied and told me any differently.

lol at the part in bold. I know some people do get annoyed at people using the term African-American to label black people. Not all black people ancestors are from Africa, but I understand the need for a lot black people to try and understand where they came from.I definitely get that. On the flip side I think it's somewhat amusing that when sometimes some white people will label list every european nationality to describe their race. When race is brought up, instead of just saying they are white they will say they are Scottish, French, Irish, English, etc... There is nothing wrong with them talking about their hertiage or where they/their families are from, but as far as race goes they are still white, lol. In fact I think there was another Loreal commerical, where a white actress/model was talking about how being something like Austrailian, Irish, Scottish,(something like that) etc, made up the color of her skin tone. I also find it amusing when some people say things like they are 1/38th Native American.(Yeah, I'm exaggerating, but people know that I mean). And couldn't that be anybody, really? When those things are said sometimes, I find that amusing.

Even though I don't think nationality has anything to do with looks, I do find it more useful than race because it gives you a location with which you can identify to some degree. Race becomes more useless to me as each 99day goes by because it's only used to pigeon hole black people for the most part. Either people try to make out as if there is something terribly wrong with being black (hence one drop makes you less than worthy) and like you said I'm 1/99 Indian which makes me better than black, or people are trying to force everyone that looks like he or she is black into "admitting" it or be labeled a self-hater.

This is what a kid asked and said to me today: Who decided to classify people by race and what criteria did said person or people use? Some white man who wanted to make everyone else feel subordinate and everyone just went along with it because the white man is so much smarter. The Civil Rights movement in some ways can be boiled down to the desire of black people to sit at the same lunch counter with white people as though eating with white people is some major accomplishment in life (I know it's much more but this is a kid's perspective). When siblings with the same parents turn out to look black and white is one white and the other black or are they both the same race? What changes when you find out someone is black?

If CK left then true, this wouldn't have been...

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