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Closeted (gay) actors formerly on the soaps

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10 minutes ago, ReddFoxx said:

In an interview Thaao once called the actor who played Bart "delicious". It was in the context of acting, but I still think only a gay man would call anyone delicious in any context.

There is another word only gay guys use that I happened to use and that's how my friend discovered I was gay...but at this moment I can't recall the word I used....LOL. The word used was to describe something....

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49 minutes ago, Soapsuds said:

There is another word only gay guys use that I happened to use and that's how my friend discovered I was gay...but at this moment I can't recall the word I used....LOL. The word used was to describe something....

 

Fabulous? 

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6 minutes ago, Bright Eyes said:

 

Fabulous? 

Nope...but that's another one...LOL. I believe it was another word for beautiful. I actually caught myself saying it but it was too late....and my friend picked up on it right away....haha

 

Funny though I never have used the word fabulous......LOL

Edited by Soapsuds

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3 hours ago, j swift said:

However, I still maintain that there was a "Liberace-Effect" in the soap press, wherein female editors of female-skewed soap magazines that tried to sell dish soap to housewives didn't want to see or hear that their favorite male stars were gay because it interrupted the illusion of the soap hunk. 

 

I can't see into the operation of each soap editor's mind. But I can tell you that from the 90's forward, there wasn't any culture of denial that I think you're describing here. Everyone knows / knew who was doing who - whether it involved being gay, straight, or bi... As Vee made reference to, every show had/has a publicist who is supposed to be in the loop on every interview & conversation their talent is having with the press. The talent is also supposed to be checking with the publicist on things they will or won't talk about. Nobody was to violate that publicist relationship.

 

The idea that the soap mags were overrun by women desperate not to shatter hunky delusions, is the real fantasy here. About a third of the magazines' editorial staff were gay men, and one of the most recognizable and respected editors in the industry was an out lesbian - certainly none of those were personally invested in maintaining such an illusion. But they and everyone else were all journalists who (*with a few infamous exceptions) always practiced with professionalism. They knew their #1 job was to produce the kind of compelling content that sells the issues.

 

Keeping an actor's sexual orientation, even their entire personal life - straight included  - out of the pages was always the doing of said actor, the actor's representation, and/or the production they worked for. 

Edited by YurSoakinginit

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3 minutes ago, YurSoakinginit said:

The idea that the soap mags were overrun by women desperate not to shatter hunky delusions, is the real fantasy here. About a third of the magazines' editorial staff were gay men, and one of the most recognizable and respected editors in the industry was an out lesbian - certainly none of those were personally invested in maintaining such an illusion. But they and everyone else were all journalists who (*with a few infamous exceptions) always practiced with professionalism. They knew their #1 job was to produce the kind of compelling content that sells the issues.

 

Keeping an actor's sexual orientation, even their entire personal life - straight included  - out of the pages was always the doing of said actor, the actor's representation, and/or the production they worked for. 

That is an excellent point, well stated, thank you for your insight

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2 minutes ago, j swift said:

That is an excellent point, well stated, thank you for your insight

 

Let me say, though, I know there are a few editors who attracted themselves some attention... and might have left the kind of impression you're describing! I don't fault anyone for their thoughts about the soap magazines. So really, thank you for bringing it up. 

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3 hours ago, YurSoakinginit said:

But I can tell you that from the 90's forward, there wasn't any culture of denial that I think you're describing here. Everyone knows / knew who was doing who - whether it involved being gay, straight, or bi... As Vee made reference to, every show had/has a publicist who is supposed to be in the loop on every interview & conversation their talent is having with the press. The talent is also supposed to be checking with the publicist on things they will or won't talk about. Nobody was to violate that publicist relationship.

 

The idea that the soap mags were overrun by women desperate not to shatter hunky delusions, is the real fantasy here. About a third of the magazines' editorial staff were gay men, and one of the most recognizable and respected editors in the industry was an out lesbian - certainly none of those were personally invested in maintaining such an illusion. But they and everyone else were all journalists who (*with a few infamous exceptions) always practiced with professionalism. They knew their #1 job was to produce the kind of compelling content that sells the issues.

 

Keeping an actor's sexual orientation, even their entire personal life - straight included  - out of the pages was always the doing of said actor, the actor's representation, and/or the production they worked for. 

 

But in fairness, isn't that exactly what a culture of denial is? They sold an image of the closeted actors to the predominantly heterosexual and (often) domestic female audience. They may be in on the real story but that's still selling a product. I absolutely don't think the magazines weren't in the know, but I do think they specifically reinforced a sanitized delusion, just like in the old Hollywood studio system. It was a lie agreed upon and a selling point.

 

I don't condemn anyone for things being as they were, but I am under no illusions about it not being a comfortable fiction willingly sold to an often clueless public.

Edited by Vee

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5 hours ago, Vee said:

But in fairness, isn't that exactly what a culture of denial is? They sold an image of the closeted actors to the predominantly heterosexual and (often) domestic female audience.

 

That isn't the same scenario that j swift was describing, which is what I was responding to. Maybe I should have said "self-denial."

 

But yes, "culture of denial" also applies to what you said, all of which is valid. Well beyond magazines (soap or otherwise), pretty much every part of the entertainment industry -  from execs, producers, publicists, to actors themselves - helped maintain that order. Too many still do.

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Howard McGillin the last Dr. Greg Foster on Y&R

Russell Todd Goldberg the last Dr. James Frame on Another World

Christopher Durham: Matt McCandless on Capitol, Dakota on RH

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On 5/27/2019 at 4:01 PM, GymnastGuy said:

Howard McGillin the last Dr. Greg Foster on Y&R

 

Just for clarification's sake, Greg Foster was a lawyer, not a doctor. The physician in the family was his elder brother, Snapper.

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