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AMC Tribute Thread

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According to Lucci, her father, Victor, suffered a heart attack in his forties, so there was a genetic element involved.

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Please be careful, Susan. My heart couldn't take something worse.

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"It's a match made in soap opera and Hallmark heaven...as ALL MY CHILDREN's Susan Lucci and GENERAL HOSPITAL's Vanessa Marcil team up to play the world's most glamorous mother-and-daughter crime-solving duo in...'The Supermodel Mysteries'.  Coming this Summer to Hallmark Movies & Mysteries."

 

;)

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1 hour ago, Khan said:

"It's a match made in soap opera and Hallmark heaven...as ALL MY CHILDREN's Susan Lucci and GENERAL HOSPITAL's Vanessa Marcil team up to play the world's most glamorous mother-and-daughter crime-solving duo in...'The Supermodel Mysteries'.  Coming this Summer to Hallmark Movies & Mysteries."

 

;)

 

I'd watch! Sounds better than all those stupid Allison Sweeney movies.

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11 minutes ago, Darn said:

Sounds better than all those stupid Allison Sweeney movies.

 

True dat.  Mama Khan LOOOOOOOOOVES "Murder, She Baked" and I'm like --

 

giphy.gif

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I know this story was mostly trash but the lengthy scene near the end of this where Mona [!@#$%^&*] talks a dying Richard Fields at length (with the pretext given that she didn't realize he wasn't faking - in McTavish's later stints they wouldn't have even bothered with the pretext) is classic. You can see where Erica is her daughter. It must have been difficult and strange for Frances Heflin to play such ugly, melodramatic material in her final months of life, but at least viewers got one last showcase of her talent. 

 

 

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2 hours ago, DRW50 said:

I know this story was mostly trash but the lengthy scene near the end of this where Mona [!@#$%^&*] talks a dying Richard Fields at length (with the pretext given that she didn't realize he wasn't faking - in McTavish's later stints they wouldn't have even bothered with the pretext) is classic. You can see where Erica is her daughter. It must have been difficult and strange for Frances Heflin to play such ugly, melodramatic material in her final months of life, but at least viewers got one last showcase of her talent. 

 

 

 

Yes, I remember this well. They showed a portion of it on the AMC 25th anniversary episode of Oprah when they paid tribute to Mrs. Heflin.

 

Listening to Anton here, he sounds like a young Victor Newman.

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Awesome thread. Curious as to what is considered the last solid quality year for AMC? In watching old  episodes on youtube something seemed to fall off after 1997. 

Edited by ironlion

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19 hours ago, DRW50 said:

I know this story was mostly trash but the lengthy scene near the end of this where Mona [!@#$%^&*] talks a dying Richard Fields at length (with the pretext given that she didn't realize he wasn't faking - in McTavish's later stints they wouldn't have even bothered with the pretext) is classic. You can see where Erica is her daughter. It must have been difficult and strange for Frances Heflin to play such ugly, melodramatic material in her final months of life, but at least viewers got one last showcase of her talent. 

 

 

 

I disagree, I actually liked the story... the problem was the casting of Sarah Michelle Gellar in the part.  It threw off the timeline quite a bit.

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