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Thanks for that.

It all seems very odd.

I can understand the need to transition to new characters but to completely drop the whole cast?

I wonder if Ned and Mary got a proper send off?

Bill, do you know the names of any of the actors of the new characters?

It might help me track down more info...

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@Paul Raven, @Bill Bauer

 

 

 

Tim Lawrence ...Rye Billsbury

                               Les Mitchell

Claire Marshall Lawrence McNeill   Eloise Kummer

                                         Sharon Grainger

Rev. Jonathan McNeill    Sidney Breese

Nina Lawrence Chadwick    Barbara Luddy

                            Lois Zarley   

Angie Manno        ?????

Peter Manno    Michael Romano
                                    Jay Novello

Greg Warner       ?????

Mrs. Warner    ??????

Larry Lawrence    ??????

Ricky Lawrence    ?????

 

Reverend Dr. Richard Gaylord     John Barclay

Peggy Lamont Gaylord     Jane Webb 

Mrs.Gaylord    Helen Buell

 

Here's what I have on the characters mentioned

Edited by slick jones
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According to Soap Central Rose Kransky took a job with Doris Cameron, which would be the beginning of Right To Happiness. She returned to Five Points (and Guiding Light) when Mary Holden told her that Mrs Kransky was experiencing hardship.

This indicates that the Kranskys stayed in Five Points.

But according to other information they had moved next door to the Burkes on RTH.

If the Kranskys stayed in Five Points but moved to a better part of town, then the Burkes also lived in Five Points yet didn't seem to figure at all in Guiding Light as the Kransky's neighbors. Still confused.

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11 hours ago, Paul Raven said:

According to Soap Central Rose Kransky took a job with Doris Cameron, which would be the beginning of Right To Happiness. She returned to Five Points (and Guiding Light) when Mary Holden told her that Mrs Kransky was experiencing hardship.

This indicates that the Kranskys stayed in Five Points.

But according to other information they had moved next door to the Burkes on RTH.

If the Kranskys stayed in Five Points but moved to a better part of town, then the Burkes also lived in Five Points yet didn't seem to figure at all in Guiding Light as the Kransky's neighbors. Still confused.

 

Welcome to the world of radio soap opera history. LOL. Shoddy and careless record keeping, misinformation, deceased players, poor memories, lack of original source material, etc. Although trying to piece it all together can be fun like a mystery or a jigsaw puzzle. 

 

I don't have the names of actors off-hand but I'll try to find the names later. Slick did a good job. Although Jonathan McNeill was a medical doctor, not a reverend. Any characters you specifically had in mind? 

 

I'm not sure about Ned and Mary. They aren't mentioned in the story synopses after they got married even though Rev. Ruthledge was still in the story a couple of years after they got married. Perhaps they moved away? I know that Ned went to Selby Flats to present the friendship lamp to Rev. Matthews after Rev. Ruthledge died but he didn't stick around. No mention of Mary. Of course, I'm going by the storyline synopses. I'm sure all these things were explained and talked about on the actual show but we will never know. 

Edited by Bill Bauer
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Nov 1945 Barbara Fuller Gets Claudia Role

Blonde Barbara Fuller is the new Claudia in "One Man's Family" (NBC, Sundays, 2:30 p. m., WOW). For the first time in the 13 -year history of the NBC program, Writer- Producer Carlton E. Morse has brought in someone new to play one of the major roles in the story. I have been besieged with requests to bring Claudia back to "One Man's Family" ever since Kathleen Wilson, who originally played the part, left the cast two years ago," said Morse. "I have waited this long because I wanted to be sure that I had found the right person for the role. Barbara Fuller is a perfect Claudia."

Miss Fuller, who also plays the part of Barry Fitzgerald's niece, Susan, in the new NBC program, "His Honor, the Barber," has been a radio actress in Chicago and New York since she was 9 years old.

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15 hours ago, Paul Raven said:

Nov 1945 Barbara Fuller Gets Claudia Role

Blonde Barbara Fuller is the new Claudia in "One Man's Family" (NBC, Sundays, 2:30 p. m., WOW). For the first time in the 13 -year history of the NBC program, Writer- Producer Carlton E. Morse has brought in someone new to play one of the major roles in the story. I have been besieged with requests to bring Claudia back to "One Man's Family" ever since Kathleen Wilson, who originally played the part, left the cast two years ago," said Morse. "I have waited this long because I wanted to be sure that I had found the right person for the role. Barbara Fuller is a perfect Claudia."

Miss Fuller, who also plays the part of Barry Fitzgerald's niece, Susan, in the new NBC program, "His Honor, the Barber," has been a radio actress in Chicago and New York since she was 9 years old.

 

 

One of soaps' first "back from the dead" storylines (which I hate).  I was not happy that they brought Claudia back from the dead even though I liked the character. Morse should  have either not killed her off in the first place or left her dead. It may have been OMF's first "jump the shark" moment. The other one being Cousin Jediah. I can't remember which came first. Although at least this back-from-the-dead storyline made logical sense as opposed to most modern ones (I'm looking at you in particular Days). 

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June 1943

RADIO'S MOST FAMOUS FAMILY "ONE MAN'S FAMILY" IS DEDICATED TO MOTHERS AND FATHERS AND THEIR BEWILDERING OFFSPRINGS 

The Radio show "One Man's Family" seems as old as Methuselah, as time-honored as radio, itself, customary as a Sunday Night supper. The show has been coming over the ether weekly for eleven years. Eight of those venerable mileposts have had the same sponsor, who still has seven years to go. The program was, first produced by NBC on the west coast as a sustaining in 1932. Two years later it went nationwide, has long since become a radio legend, earned its author half a million dollars-added steadily to the fortunes of its cast. In the history of "the Family" there have been four deaths, one divorce, fifty characters introduced-twelve permanent Sunday night visitors.

 

Out of the half a hundred who have played various parts, most of the original cast still remain through the perpetual saga: Some of them began as script school children and were written into adulthood, others who started as juveniles are now playing romantic leads. When a member of the cast is drafted, dies, or gets married, so it is written into the script an4 even though he returns no more, his memory is kept alive through references. Becoming a part of "One Man's Family" is almost a practical guarantee of a lifetime job, and pleasant security. The mystery of its appeal is still a mystery. It's theme is nothing more complicated than the daily happenings of an average American home. It's institutional family attempts to intercept certain phases of ordinary happenings, philosophies, weaves in wars, floods and calamities to give it a 'timeliness, but it always remains'the closely knit story of a family of twelve. There is little or no conflict. On some shows, nothing actually happens. The characters merely sit around and talk. They aren't witty; they don't tear at your emotions, you are rarely perturbed-they are certainly never profound.

 

Paul, favorite and beloved character to millions of people, often engages in some quiet talk that is inspiring, but even these choice bits of inspiration are something you know, already. The most probable secret of the success of the whole thing is its seeming sincerity. The cast has been playing the parts for so long that they are almost as real to them as their everyday life. When they enter the studio on Sunday night there is a spirit of "going home" quite prevalent, they call each other by their script names and discuss things that happened in last week's show as if it were really part and parcel of their life. When Page Gilman, who has played Jack, the youngest son, since the show went on the air, was drafted into the Army it affected the whole cast. Quiet, gray, velvet -voiced Mother Barbour called the cast together at rehearsal and said: "The war has come to our housenold." They were as sad as if Page were son and brother. Each of them felt a new responsibility toward the war effort. Mother Barbour took up knitting to send him a sweater, Claudia, the script sister, went out and joined the motor corp division of AWVS, Radio sister Hazel became a Hollywood Canteen hostess. All of which impetus sprang from a radio's brother going to the front.

 

At another time the script called for Hazel to have a baby. The event was given a terrific build-up, week after week,- when the script baby finally arrived, it had all seemed so wonderful that Hazel had herself a real baby. Listeners to "One Man's Family" often comment: "Gosh, the man who writes that script must have some family!

 

The man who writes the script is 40 -years -old Carlton E. Morse,who has no family, anal often expresses an aversion to children. Formerly a cowboy, rancher of the range, Hearst writer and police reporter, he got an idea for his family series from reading Galsworthy's Forsythe Saga. Morse was, however, born into a family of six, of Dutch parentage, and sometimes his family is reflected but never mirrored in the radio show. While he was still an infant the Morses bought a ranch in Oregon where Carlton learned about cattle during the day and read classics at night. Ambitious to get away from the cattle, he turned to newspaper writing. It was while he was a Hearst columnist that he met and married blonde, witty, Patricia Morse, who is severe critic of all he does. In 1929, with newspapers folding under him almost weekly, he decided radio looked rather permanent, introduced his "Family," and -he and radio have been permanent and inseparable ever since. The program is carried on a full NBC network, has won trophies and awards of all types, continually remains one of the biggest draws in radio. In eleven years it has consumed scripts equivalent to 41 average length novels. Out of those three million, two hundred and fifty thousand words has come nothing more astounding than a glimpse each Sunday of the ordinary conversation of a fictional average family.

 

Some writers claim that Morse gets by with murder in depicting his family, and that he certainly gets by the censors. Basis for their claim is several rather risque chapters, one memorable example being the night the debonaire Clifford was in a hospital and the beautiful nurse, while giving him a bath, engaged in some romantic language. The whole thing was an everyday hospital occurrence, but it jolted listeners into closer attention and accumulated several million more for the next broadcast. True, also, is the fact that births and "the facts of life" are treated frankly in the Barbour family. So familiar to radio audiences is "One Man's Family" that it is considered a real family rather than fictional creatures. All of the cast receives fan mail addressed to them by their air names. This is a tribute to an author, who neither listens to Beethoven, studies newspapers, nor frequents a bar for inspiration. Morse-he just sits down at his typewriter and waits. Since the proof of the pudding is axiomatically in the eating, his prosaic method of writing is eminently successful. From his stare -at -a -blank -page has come a germinating plot. Perhaps that is why for eleven years millions of families, in homes large and small across the country, have gathered around the radio at that old familiar theme-"One Man's Family" is dedicated to the mothers and fathers of the younger generation and to their bewildering offsprings." If the listening audience is sometimes bewildered by the galaxy of names flitting in and out of the script, it is also apparently entertained.

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On 10/2/2020 at 2:52 AM, Bill Bauer said:

I know that Ned went to Selby Flats to present the friendship lamp to Rev. Matthews after Rev. Ruthledge died but he didn't stick around

The Variety review said that a divinity student delivered the lamp in the first episode of the Selby Flats episode so not Ned Holden?

Some summaries from the 40's

June 10 1940

 In this episode, Myrna returns to San Francisco in a depression and tries to bury her grief by returning to her broadcasting career. Martin Kane thinks she's sad because her ex-husband, Ned Holden, is marrying Mary Rutledge. However, Myrna says that isn't the case. She confesses that she met a man on the East Coast and fell in love with him. Myrna refuses to give details, but says that the relationship ended. Martin says that she may have misinterpreted the entire affair and that he'll wait for her.

 

NB Myrna is Torchy Reynolds actual first name.

 

June 12 1940

In this episode, Rose Kransky remains after hours with her boss, Jack Felzer, to compensate for the time she took to attend Ned and Mary's wedding. Jack asks about the nuptials, which leads to a discussion of how Rose, Ned, and Mary all grew up in Five Points. Rose realizes why Jack knows so much about her background: He had read about her in the newspapers during her recent court appearance. Jack tells her that he admired her conduct under such trying circumstances. She admits that she wanted to escape her former life. Implying that he's romantically interested in her, Jack counsels Rose to simply accept her destiny.

 

May 7 1945

In this episode, attorney Peter Manno talks to Angela Mason about the custody case he is working on. He explains that much of the judge's decision in the case will depend on the testimony of a woman named Nana. The program is interrupted by a news update, which informs the public on the progress of the official end of the war in Europe. The program resumes as Manno says the nation should establish federal regulations that will protect the rights of people who adopt children. 

 

August 10 1945

In this episode, lawyer Peter Manno has decided to come clean about a mistake he made seven years ago, despite the fact that only his wife Angie knows of the misdeed. Peter goes to Mr. Burrows, confessing what happened after he was assigned to the 1935 jewel robbery case. Mr. Burrows never knew that Peter's brother, Tony, was involved, nor the fact that Peter gave Tony a second chance after the heist. Peter begs that Tony be left alone, as Tony has "gone straight" by becoming an accountant, getting married and having two children. Mr. Burrows agrees, but says that Peter will be judged by the Bar Association's grievance committee the next day -- and may end up disbarred and disgraced

 

August 14 1945

 The bar has censured Peter for his wrongdoing. Peter decides not to run for office and hands in his resignation as assistant state attorney. 

 

 

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19 minutes ago, Paul Raven said:

The Variety review said that a divinity student delivered the lamp in the first episode of the Selby Flats episode so not Ned Holden?

Some summaries from the 40's

June 10 1940

 In this episode, Myrna returns to San Francisco in a depression and tries to bury her grief by returning to her broadcasting career. Martin Kane thinks she's sad because her ex-husband, Ned Holden, is marrying Mary Rutledge. However, Myrna says that isn't the case. She confesses that she met a man on the East Coast and fell in love with him. Myrna refuses to give details, but says that the relationship ended. Martin says that she may have misinterpreted the entire affair and that he'll wait for her.

 

NB Myrna is Torchy Reynolds actual first name.

 

June 12 1940

In this episode, Rose Kransky remains after hours with her boss, Jack Felzer, to compensate for the time she took to attend Ned and Mary's wedding. Jack asks about the nuptials, which leads to a discussion of how Rose, Ned, and Mary all grew up in Five Points. Rose realizes why Jack knows so much about her background: He had read about her in the newspapers during her recent court appearance. Jack tells her that he admired her conduct under such trying circumstances. She admits that she wanted to escape her former life. Implying that he's romantically interested in her, Jack counsels Rose to simply accept her destiny.

 

May 7 1945

In this episode, attorney Peter Manno talks to Angela Mason about the custody case he is working on. He explains that much of the judge's decision in the case will depend on the testimony of a woman named Nana. The program is interrupted by a news update, which informs the public on the progress of the official end of the war in Europe. The program resumes as Manno says the nation should establish federal regulations that will protect the rights of people who adopt children. 

 

August 10 1945

In this episode, lawyer Peter Manno has decided to come clean about a mistake he made seven years ago, despite the fact that only his wife Angie knows of the misdeed. Peter goes to Mr. Burrows, confessing what happened after he was assigned to the 1935 jewel robbery case. Mr. Burrows never knew that Peter's brother, Tony, was involved, nor the fact that Peter gave Tony a second chance after the heist. Peter begs that Tony be left alone, as Tony has "gone straight" by becoming an accountant, getting married and having two children. Mr. Burrows agrees, but says that Peter will be judged by the Bar Association's grievance committee the next day -- and may end up disbarred and disgraced

 

August 14 1945

 The bar has censured Peter for his wrongdoing. Peter decides not to run for office and hands in his resignation as assistant state attorney. 

 

 

 

Yeah, I think that Variety review you posted is the only place that says it was a divinity student. Everything else I've read (2, maybe 3, other sources) said it was Ned. Who knows? As I've lamented before, there's a lot of misinformation in those history synopses. I would probably go more with something that was written at the same time that the story was actually being told which would be the Variety article I suppose. 

 

Where did you get those episode summaries? I knew the June 12, 1940 episode existed but I've been unable to find it. I never knew, however, that the May 7, 1945 episode or the August 14, 1945 episodes even existed. Is that from a museum website or something? Thanks so much for posting that! It gives me hope that there's a lot more out there than I'm aware of!

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55 minutes ago, Bill Bauer said:

Where did you get those episode summaries? I knew the June 12, 1940 episode existed but I've been unable to find it. I never knew, however, that the May 7, 1945 episode or the August 14, 1945 episodes even existed. Is that from a museum website or something? Thanks so much for posting that! It gives me hope that there's a lot more out there than I'm aware of!

They are from the Paley Center.

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BRIGHT HORIZON CBS 1943

 

MICHAEL WEST has the distinction of having been a radio character before his serial, "Bright Horizon," was even born. For Michael was previously so successful, in "Big Sister," that a whole new show was written around him. At that time, the part was played by Joe Julian. But, with the birth of "Bright Hórizon," the role was taken over by actor -singer -producer Richard Kollmar-who has some very special distinctions of his own. Baritone -voiced Dick Kollmar is known to Broadway as a singing star who has had romantic leads in such musical hits as "Knickerbocker Holiday" and "Too Many Girls." This past summer, he has been both producing and starring in his own gay musical comedy, "Early to Bed." But, to the networks, triple -threat Kollmar is a straight actor. In fact, the bulk of his bigtime broadcastine was once devoted to being "ghost actor" for other singers. He's been the speaking voice for such operatic stars as John Charles Thomas, Richard Crooks, Lawrence Tibbett and others in many a dramatized musical air show. Since then, he's made a name in such dramatic roles as David in "Claudia and David," and the original John in "John's Other Wife." Actually married to Broadway columnist Dorothy Kilgallen, he's been very busy, on the airwaves, as husband of innumerable heroines. His "Bright Horizon" wife a role created by Sammie Hill-is now being played by Joan Alexander. They've been through plenty of marital excitement together, as the following pages show. For here are the pictures of those who enact the main characters in this serial, with a synopsis of their particular contributions to the story's development-so far.

 

MICHAEL WEST (played by Richard Kollmar) is very much in love with his wife, Carol, but their'marriage has a tragic history. Wounded and released from service, he had settled down in Riverfield to fight a home -front battle as district attorney. Then, suddenly, he disappeared. He lost his memory in Chicago, where Margaret discovered him, convinced him that they were man and wife and took him to far-off San Francisco to regain his health.

 

CAROL WEST (Joan Alexander) is Michael's real wife, who believed in him even during his strange disappearance. At that time, she was expecting their baby and could do little to join in the nationwide hunt for him. When he was finally discovered, she flew out to California only to learn that he couldn't recognize her yet. She brought him back to Riverfield, where her loving kindness is helping him to 'rebuild his former life.

 

MARGARET ANDERSON (Lesley Woods) is both lovely and talented-but determined to get what she wants. What she wanted most .was Michael and, when she found him suffering from amnesia, she didn't even consider either his wife or her own husband. When the latter found them in California, she promised to start a new life there with Ted (Jackie Grimes), her son by a former marriage who had been living with her mother (Irene Hubbard).

 

CHARLES MCCAREY (Richard Keith), Michael's best friend, is secretly in love with Cato! but he had already proved his devotion to both of them by marrying Margaret, in a vain attempt to keep her from interfering with their happiness. Having helped Carol to find her husband, he is now back in Riverfield-where he runs a defense factory-helping Michael fight the subversive activities of Vexie Garbett (James Van Dyke). -

 

BARBARA (Renee Terry) is Michael's 17 -year -old niece and has lived with the Wests since the disappearance of her father, who was a missionary in China. She has a lovely singing voice . and her vocal studies once took her to San Francisco, where she almost discovered her missing Uncle Michael. She didn't see him then, however, and he was finally identified through a picture in -a magazine

 

PENNY (Will Geer.) works in McCarey's 'defense factory and is his loyal "stooge" whenever there's .dirty work to be done, in order to beat Garbett's hired thugs at their own game. He has his. hands full, too. Garbett-who owns most of Riverfield and is supposed to be its most respectable pillar of society-is a very nasty customer indeed and not a bit above trying to kidnap the fighting young district attorney, who is trying to prosecute Garbett for the latter's "black market- and political crimes.

 

LILY (Alice Goodkin), a hard-bóiled ,little waitress in a restaurant owned by Garbett, helps Penny, gather incriminating evidence against the gangsters. She is one of several minor characters who are frequently heard during the course of 'Bright Horizon." Another important -though -small role is that of Madame Duprey (Anne Thomas), Barbara's 'talkative and temperamental French singing 'teacher

 

BONNIE (Audrey. Totter) and her husband, Jerry Reilly (Johnny Gibson), are a happy-go-lucky couple who were Michael's friends in San Francisco, before he discovered who he really. was.

 

Other friends of his, back in Riverfield, include Mr. Boyce (Bill Johnstone), who owns the newspaper in which Michael has attacked Garbett for his political views, and June Clark, the pretty girl reporter played by Coral Tempest.

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