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Billboard's #1 Pop Singles


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#741 I Am A Swede

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 12:33 PM

In another post, I touched upon the list of "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time" that was compiled by "Rolling Stone" magazine. In their opinion, the greatest song of all-time was "Like a Rolling Stone" by Bob Dylan (which also was from 1965, though it only peaked at #2). The tune that ranked second was "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction."


Most overrated rock band ever. Don't care for a lot of their songs. This one is OK but just done to death.


I've never understood the popularity of either The Rolling Stones or Bob Dylan. The word "overrated" almost feels inadequate.

Edited by I Am A Swede, 19 July 2012 - 12:34 PM.

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#742 Max

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 01:56 AM

I've never understood the popularity of either The Rolling Stones or Bob Dylan. The word "overrated" almost feels inadequate.


I think that Bob Dylan is much more overrated than the Rolling Stones (though I don't care for them, either).

The second and final chart-topper for Herman's Hermits was the silly "I'm Henry VIII, I Am," which spent one week at number one: the week ended 8/7/65.



As you might imagine, the roots of "I'm Henry VIII, I Am" date to before the start of the rock era. According to "The 'Billboard' Book of Number One Hits," the tune was "written in 1911 by Fred Murray and R.P. Weston and [was first] popularized by Harry Champion." Four years before Herman's Hermits had a #1 hit with it, British singer Joe Brown revived the song's popularity in his native land. (In Britain, Herman's Hermits' version of the record did not chart.)

The group remained very popular for the next eighteen months or so, before fizzling out. Below is a list of their remaining top 40 singles:

"Just a Little Bit Better" (#7, 1965)
"A Must to Avoid" (#8, 1966)
"Listen People" (#3, 1966)
"Leaning on the Lamp Post" (#9, 1966)
"This Door Swings Both Ways" (#12, 1966)
"Dandy" (#5, 1966)
"East West" (#27, 1966)
"There's a Kind of Hush" (#4, 1967)
"No Milk Today" (#35, 1967)
"Don't Go Out Into the Rain (You're Going to Melt)' (#18, 1967)
"Museum" (#39, 1967)
"I Can Take or Leave Your Loving" (#22, 1968)

In 1971, Peter Noone left the group. The split was acrimonious, and Noone tried (but failed) to legally stop the remaining group members from using the official Herman's Hermits name. (Strangely enough, Noone is still able to use the "Herman's Hermits starring Peter Noone" moniker, and does so when he tours with his band.) Though Peter's solo career flopped, he has stayed in the limelight by touring and returning to acting.

Edited by Max, 21 July 2012 - 02:17 AM.

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#743 DRW50

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 07:34 PM

That's such a fun song.

A 1965 classic which should have been a much bigger hit.


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#744 alphanguy74

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 09:42 PM

Although I don't care for novelty songs for the most part, this one is ok. It seems to suit his voice, and every once in a while, pop music needs a little levity.
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#745 MissLlanviewPA

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 10:13 PM

I know I posted this in the GNR thread already, but this is the 25th anniversary of the release of Appetite for Destruction, which includes their only number one hit, "Sweet Child O'Mine" (a song that was initially seen as a joke/album filler by most of the band). It actually took them over a year after AFD came out for them to really hit it big, though.
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#746 Max

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Posted 25 July 2012 - 06:38 PM

"Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me" is absolutely superb, and it is a travesty that it only peaked at #8.

I know I posted this in the GNR thread already, but this is the 25th anniversary of the release of Appetite for Destruction, which includes their only number one hit, "Sweet Child O'Mine" (a song that was initially seen as a joke/album filler by most of the band). It actually took them over a year after AFD came out for them to really hit it big, though.


MissLlanviewPA, aside from "Sweet Child O' Mine" being Guns N' Roses' only #1 hit, I was unaware of any other info in your above post. Thank you so much for sharing.

One of the most iconic songs of 1965 (though not a song I care for, because it is way too "hippy-ish" for my tastes) is "I Got You Babe" by Sonny & Cher, which held the peak position for three weeks: the weeks ended 8/14/65, 8/21/65, & 8/28/65.



Salvatore Phillip Bono (born 2/16/35) was one of the most respected musicians in Los Angeles, having worked for Phil Spector (among others). In November 1962, he met Cherilyn Sakisian LaPierre (born 5/20/46) at a coffee shop; though she was only sixteen at the time, she lied to Sonny about her age and claimed that she was actually eighteen. Soon, Sonny was able to use his connections to land Cher gigs at singing backup (along with him) on Spector records. In 1964, the two lovers wed. (They would divorce eleven years later.)

"I Got You Babe" was written and produced by Bono and released on Ahmet Ertegun's Atco (Atlantic) Records. Sonny absolutely loved the song, but Ertegun felt that the flip-side--"It's Gonna Rain"--was the one with hit potential. Ahmet would have gotten his way had he not been outsmarted: Sonny went to radio station KHJ and asked them to play "I Got You Babe" once every hour (in exchange for granting that station exclusive rights to that song). Because the response to "I Got You Babe" was so favorable, Atco was forced to give that song the A-side designation.

Sonny & Cher racked up more top forty hits following "I Got You Babe":

"Baby Don't Go" (#8, 1965) [This was recorded prior to "I Got You Babe," but didn't become popular until after Sonny & Cher had a #1 hit.]
"Just You" (#20, 1965)
"But You're Mine" (#15, 1965)
"What Now My Love" (#14, 1966)
"Little Man" (#21, 1966)
"The Beat Goes On" (#6, 1967)
"All I Ever Need Is You" (#7, 1971)
"A Cowboy's Work Is Never Done" (#8, 1972)
"When You Say Love" (#32, 1972)

(Also note that Sonny had one hit as a solo artist: 1965's "Laugh at Me," which reached #10. Cher, of course, would rack up many solo hits, including four chart-toppers.)

The duo of Sonny & Cher were probably just as well known for their CBS variety series as for their music. Beginning in 1971, "The Sonny & Cher Comedy Hour" was a commercial smash; it ended three years later only because of the couple's marital woes (as opposed to any ratings decline). After their divorce, from 1976-77, a revival (called "The Sonny and Cher Show") was attempted. Unfortunately, many felt that this show paled in comparison to the original.

Despite their widely different political views, Sonny was originally a liberal. He became a conservative after becoming intensly frustrated over the massive amounts of red tape that he encountered while opening up a restaurant in Palm Springs. On April 13, 1988, Bono was elected mayor of that town. (By an odd coincidence, Cher had won the Academy Award for Best Actress for her role in "Moonstruck" one day eariler.) Sonny was in the middle of serving his second term in the U.S. House of Representatives when he was tragically killed in a skiing accident on January 5, 1998.

Edited by Max, 25 July 2012 - 06:39 PM.

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#747 alphanguy74

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Posted 25 July 2012 - 06:50 PM

I like all of Sonny and Cher's songs.... although I think "The Beat Goes On" is the best of their hits. The bridge of "I Got You Babe" is really what makes it, as far as I'm concerned. After seeing Cher at Sonny's funeral, I am convinced that he was the love of her life, and considering her relationship with him was the longest she ever sustained with any man. People may make fun of Sonny's singing voice, and true, he ain't no great singer... he only sang with Cher because she was too scared to stand onstage by herself.... but he sings every bit as good as someone like Mick Jagger and certainly better than the vastly overrated Bob Dylan.
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#748 quartermainefan

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Posted 25 July 2012 - 08:35 PM

I love "I got you babe". It doesn't seem hippyish really, just a song imbued with the innocence of the young and the belief that all they need is love. The only hippyish reference I can think of offhand is the line about they say our hair's too long. That is a common sentiment every generation thinks, although hair may be substituted for dress. It's a really sweet, optimistic, innocent song I think.
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#749 DRW50

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Posted 25 July 2012 - 10:53 PM

I Got You Babe is one of those songs you hear over and over and over. It's OK, just not one I ever had a great interest in. The most amusing part is that they must be the only #1 to reference "a pot to piss in."

I always preferred this


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#750 alphanguy74

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Posted 25 July 2012 - 11:01 PM

This one is my second favorite... an unusual song for sure... but there's just something about it. LOVE that wah wah guitar:


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#751 I Am A Swede

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Posted 26 July 2012 - 12:40 PM

I can't hear that song now without thinking of this... Posted Image


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#752 Max

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Posted 26 July 2012 - 09:58 PM

I like all of Sonny and Cher's songs.... although I think "The Beat Goes On" is the best of their hits. The bridge of "I Got You Babe" is really what makes it, as far as I'm concerned. After seeing Cher at Sonny's funeral, I am convinced that he was the love of her life, and considering her relationship with him was the longest she ever sustained with any man. People may make fun of Sonny's singing voice, and true, he ain't no great singer... he only sang with Cher because she was too scared to stand onstage by herself.... but he sings every bit as good as someone like Mick Jagger and certainly better than the vastly overrated Bob Dylan.


I completely agree that Sonny's voice was far superior to that of Bob Dylan's. I also think that "The Beat Goes On" was the duo's best song.

IMO, Cher's moving eulogy at Sonny's funeral was her finest public moment.

"I Got You Babe" was succeeded at the chart summit by "Help!" by The Beatles, which spent three weeks at number one: the weeks ended 9/4/65, 9/11/65, & 9/18/65.



According to John Lennon, "Help!" and "Strawberry Fields Forever" were among the most personal records he ever wrote. The former song was written because he was depressed and literally crying out for assistance. In spite of the tune's powerful message, Lennon was not happy about its fast tempo; it made the song sound too commercial for his tastes.

"Help!" was also the title for the second and final Beatles film directed by Richard Lester. According to "The 'Billboard' Book of Number One Hits," the movie's "plot revolved around Ringo, intended victim of a madcap scientist willing to go to any extreme to recover a ring from the drummer's finger. Figuring prominently in the story was the eight-armed God Kali, an ominous figure that helped inspire the double-entendre original title of the film, 'Eight Arms to Hold You.'"

Two more fictional portrayals of the Beatles were made after "Help!": 1967's "Magical Mystery Tour" and an animated 1968 feature titled "Yellow Submarine." Aside from "A Hard Day's Night" and "Help!," Lester remains best known for directing "Superman II" (1980) and "Superman III" (1983). (This is beyond the scope of this thread, but considerable evidence indicates that most of the ideas--and even some of the actual footage--of "Superman II" was the work of Richard Donner, who was only credited for directing the first "Superman" film.)

Edited by Max, 26 July 2012 - 09:59 PM.

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#753 MissLlanviewPA

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Posted 26 July 2012 - 11:06 PM

MissLlanviewPA, aside from "Sweet Child O' Mine" being Guns N' Roses' only #1 hit, I was unaware of any other info in your above post. Thank you so much for sharing.


No problem. :)

It's Slash in particular who hates the song. This is from the song's Wikipedia entry:


Lead guitarist Slash has been quoted as having a disdain for the song due to its roots as simply a "string skipping" exercise and a joke at the time.[3] In a VH1 special, it was stated that Slash played the riff in a jam session as a joke.[3] Drummer Steven Adler and Slash were warming up and Slash began to play a "circus" melody while making faces at Steven. Rhythm guitarist Izzy Stradlin asked Slash to play it again. Meanwhile lead singer Axl Rose was upstairs in his room and heard the 'jam session' going on downstairs and couldn't help but write lyrics. He based it on his girlfriend Erin Everly. With Steven's added drum part, Izzy's chords and Duff McKagan's bassline the harmony became the core of the song. Originally, there was a third verse to the song. However, this verse was later cut from recording as the band's producer, Mike Clink, felt the song would carry on for too long. The final dramatic breakdown was not added until Clink suggested the band add one. They agreed, but weren't sure what to do. Axl started saying to himself, "Where do we go? Where do we go now?" Clink suggested that he sing that, and "Sweet Child o' Mine" was born.


Speaking of Sonny and Cher, this is the last time they ever performed "I Got You Babe", in 1988. Very touching.


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#754 AdelaideCate007

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Posted 26 July 2012 - 11:16 PM

The number 1 song in Australia from the day I was born in December 1986 (December 15th, 1986 in Perth to be exact!)

John Farnham- You're The Voice



It went number one in several other countries, but barely made it onto the charts in America. He's huge in Australia (the only person to hit number 1 in five consecutive decades), but I don't think people in America even know who he is.

Edited by AdelaideCate007, 26 July 2012 - 11:17 PM.

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#755 DRW50

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Posted 27 July 2012 - 05:25 AM

I also thought Help was always a little too fast.

Two songs that should have been #1 in 1965 (the latter actually was, in the UK)




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#756 alphanguy74

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Posted 27 July 2012 - 09:34 AM

Yes, Judith Durham's voice is that of an angel, and this is a little known fact, but in the UK, the Seekers outsold the Beatles in the last half of 1965.
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#757 I Am A Swede

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Posted 27 July 2012 - 10:14 AM

In 1989 British girl group Bananarama teamed up with Lananeeneenoonoo (comedians Dawn French, Jennifer Saunders and Kathy Burke) and did a cover version of "Help" with the proceeds going to charity. It reached #3 in the U.K.


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#758 Max

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 02:17 PM

I love that clip of Sonny & Cher on Letterman.

Bananarama does a better job with "Help!" than the Beatles (although I don't like how they added silly bits of comedy to the recording).

It went number one in several other countries, but barely made it onto the charts in America. He's huge in Australia (the only person to hit number 1 in five consecutive decades), but I don't think people in America even know who he is.


I certainly have never heard of John Farnham.

The first protest song to reach #1 was "Eve of Destruction" by Barry McGuire, which spent one week at the top spot: the week ended 9/25/65.



Barry McGuire was born in Oklahoma City on October 15, 1937, and moved to Southern California in his early childhood. Prior to attaining success as a solo artist, he was a member of the New Christy Minstrels and was lead vocalist on two of their top 40 hits, "Green, Green" and "Saturday Night." McGuire was also an acquaintance of the Mamas & the Papas, and would later be referenced in their autobiographical single titled "Creeque Alley" (1967).

After Bob Dylan had a #2 hit with "Like a Rolling Stone," protest songs dramatically gained in popularity, and P.F. Sloan was inspired to write "Eve of Destruction." Barry had only cut a rough vocal of Sloan's record, and there was every intention of "refining" the tune at a later date. However, somebody in promotions took the cut over to a local radio station, where demand for the single soared; Dunhill Records (McGuire's record label) was forced to release "Eve of Destruction" as is.

Even with protest songs suddenly becoming en vogue, "Eve of Destruction" was controversial, especially when one considers the fact that a majority of Americans were still in favor of the Vietnam War in late 1965. A number of radio stations banned the song, and a conservative answer record--"Dawn of Correction" by the Spokesmen--reached #36 on the Hot 100.

As a soloist, McGuire was a one-hit wonder (though he later was successful in the Contemporary Christian genre). In 1971, Barry became a born-again Christian, and--for a very long time--refused to perform "Eve of Destruction." When he finally resumed singing the song, he would modernize it for the times. (For instance, "Selma, Alabama" would be replaced with "Columbine, Colorado.")

Edited by Max, 30 July 2012 - 02:17 PM.

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#759 DRW50

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 02:26 PM

That's such a depressing song, although I get the point of it.

Here's an interview with Barry from a few years ago.

http://canadianchris.../22mcguire.html

He had some good songs with John Phillips and the other Mamas and Papas. He was the first to record California Dreamin' but it didn't make his finished album. The Mamas and Papas sang background on his version, then decided to record it themselves.

There's a great song he did with them called "I Don't Wanna Know", although it doesn't seem to be on Youtube.

This is another song they sang background on, although this version is live, so they aren't in it.


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#760 I Am A Swede

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 02:30 PM

Bananarama does a better job with "Help!" than the Beatles (although I don't like how they added silly bits of comedy to the recording).


Here's a recording without the comedy. Posted Image


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