Paul Raven

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  1. Paul Raven added a post in a topic The Doctors   

    Rita Lakin's memoir'The Only Girl in the Room' has been published and there is a video on her website where she briefly mentions 'The Doctors'.She says that Orin Tovrov, creator of TD held a cattle call of writers in LA and Rita accepted the job as headwriter,She thought she would oversee a team of writers and have time to enjoy NY culture and her parents were there and could spend time with her grandchildren etc.She then found out she had to churn out a script a day and wasn't getting any assistance.She didn't know at the time that the ratings were going up each week.She says it was a nightmare.She gives the impression that she only spent 5 weeks,but I think she means she only spent 5 weeks in NY before returning to LA and working from there.
    Hopefully she goes into more detail in the book.She did manage to get Rick Edelstein as co headwriter for her second year and did make a lot of money from that gig. I wonder if she has any interest in seeing her work on the show.
    Go to ritalakin.com to watch the interview.
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  2. Paul Raven added a post in a topic OLTL Tribute Thread   

    What was the story behind Keith Charles being replaced? Was it lack of chemistry with Erika? He looks like Ivan Kipling with that moustache...
    Viki sporting that Julie Andrews hairdo.Interesting that the heroine of the show was hardly a glamor girl.I wonder if TBTB tried to get Erika to go with a softer look (considering it was the early 80's and all the shows were glamming up)
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  3. Paul Raven added a post in a topic Popular characters who've never worked for you   

    Amber (Y&R and B&B) Apparently so well loved one show was not enough! So annoying in so many ways....
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  4. Paul Raven added a post in a topic The Doctors   

    Meg Mundy tribute. Hope Retro keeps airing TD when Meg appears.
    https://classictvhistory.wordpress.com/2016/01/29/obituary-meg-mundy-1915-2016/
    Meg Mundy, an actress with extensive film and theater credits who earned her greatest fame late in her career as a soap opera villainess, died on January 12 in an assisted living facility in the Bronx, according to her only son, Sotos Yannopoulos.  Mundy’s death came eight days after her 101st birthday.
    A multi-talented beauty from a musical family, London-born Mundy was a soloist with the New York Philharmonic and a chorus girl in several Broadway shows in the late thirties.  When Mundy was 19, the legendary modeling agent John Robert Powers told her that she was no beauty, “but I bet you photograph well.”  Regal, almost icy – “in looks, she suggests a cross between Jeanne Eagels and Jessica Tandy (which isn’t bad looking),” wrote George Jean Nathan – Mundy had the kind of classy air that was perfect for formalwear and fashion magazines.  She became one of Manhattan’s most busiest models during the forties – mainly for Vogue, although Look put Mundy and Lisa Fonssagrives, aligned in aPersona-esque pose, on its January 6, 1948 cover.  Steichen, Horst, Irving Penn, and Richard Avedon all photographed her.
    Mundy’s second husband (out of four) was Marc Daniels, who after their divorce would move to Hollywood and direct for I Love Lucy and Star Trek.  Daniels taught returning veterans at the American Theatre Wing, which created a useful workshopping opportunity for his wife – the vets needed female actors to play opposite, and Mundy was a regular volunteer.  In 1942, when they met, Daniels was an actor taking voice lessons from Mundy’s mother; but his influence as he turned toward teaching and directing (“Marc taught me all I know,” she told Look, in the paternalistic parlance of 1948) helped to revive Mundy’s theatrical aspirations.
    After a short run in the Garson Kanin-directed How I Wonder (1947), Mundy played the title role in Sartre’s The Respectful Prostitute (1948), which started Off-Broadway and moved uptown to the Cort.  Critics didn’t know what to make of the play, but Mundy got great notices: “Meg Mundy gives a performance that ranks with the best acting of the season,” wrote Brooks Atkinson.  “Her Lizzie is hard but human – rasping, angry, bewildered, metallic.”  Mundy’s stage career peaked with the female lead in Sidney Kingsley’s Detective Story (1949-1950); it ran for a year and a half, but Lee Grant, in a supporting role, stole the show, and the movie version replaced Mundy and her leading man, Ralph Bellamy, with Eleanor Parker and Kirk Douglas.
    Amidst out-of-town theater jobs and the occasional cabaret engagement (“Miss Mundy is lovely to look at, but she seems rather out of place – sort of like Queen Mary on a roller coaster,” the New York Herald-Tribune wrote of a 1950 performance at the Blue Angel), Mundy was a go-to leading lady in live television.  She acted opposite Daniels in the 1948 pilot That’s Our Sherman (as in Hiram Sherman), and he directed her in segments of CBS’s Nash Airflyte Theatre and The Ford Theatre Hour, including a 1950 version of “Little Women” in which Mundy played Jo.  The latter was a family affair (Daniels’s brother, Ellis Marcus, adapted the novel) as well as an unlikely A Streetcar Named Desirereunion: Kim Hunter and Karl Malden, respectively, played Meg and Friedrich Bhaer.  Daniels recalled later that Beth’s canary wouldn’t sing during rehearsals but hit its cue during the broadcast, and praised Mundy’s “miraculous quick thinking in following an emergency on the air cut” for length.


    Mundy with Sidney Blackmer in Tales of Tomorrow (“The Dark Angel,” 1951) and Ray Walston (!) in Suspense (“Goodbye New York,” circa 1949)
    As with any survey of a live television star’s career, there are tantalizing highlights, too many of them lost.  In January 1950, she played the Barbara Stanwyck part in Sorry, Wrong Number, telecast by CBS as a one-off color test.  (“Miss Mundy’s ‘neurotic’ bed is a vivid green satin job,” reported The Washington Post.)   Mundy reunited with Detective Story co-stars Lee Grant for a Playwrights ’56 and Ralph Bellamy for a 1954 U.S. Steel Hour, “Fearful Decision” (which was restaged live a year later, with the same cast).  Mundy played Amelia Earhart on Omnibus, and starred in The Alcoa Hour’s 1957 “colorcast” of The Animal Kingdom with Robert Preston.  Few of her early television performances were filmed – in 1954, nearing forty, Mundy had a son with her third husband, opera director Dino Yannopoulos, and was reluctant to follow television’s migration to Los Angeles – but Alfred Hitchcock brought her west for “Mr. Blanchard’s Secret,” an odd sort-of send-up of Rear Window that he tossed off for his anthology.  In 1961, on the cusp of a long hiatus, Mundy played Dennis Hopper’s domineering mother in a memorable Naked City – conspiring with director Elliot Silverstein to push the Oedipal aspect to outrageous levels, Mundy’s interplay with Hopper was deliciously icky.

    Mundy and Dayton Lummis in Alfred Hitchcock Presents (“Mr. Blanchard’s Secret,” 1956)
    By the sixties, Mundy was semi-retired from acting and working as a stylist and a fashion editor for Vogue and later Mademoiselle.  (For a time, she also owned a boutique in Connecticut with another daytime star, The Secret Storm’s Lori March.)  Then a former agent brought her back for a showy role in a soap opera: that of Mona Aldrich (later Croft) in The Doctors, a mother-in-law from hell who schemed to break up the marriage of her son, Steve (David O’Brien), one of the show’s protagonists.  Soap Opera Digest called her “the Katharine Hepburn of daytime.”  Mundy played the role for almost a decade, starting around 1973, but The Doctors killed her off (with Bubonic plague) shortly before it reached its finish line in 1982.
    The Doctors role opened the door for some juicy movie parts – as Ryan O’Neal’s mother inOliver’s Story and Mary Tyler Moore’s mother in Ordinary People, plus Eyes of Laura Mars, The Bell Jar, and Fatal Attraction.  Back on Broadway in the eighties, she was Blythe Danner’s mother in The Philadelphia Story and played word games with Jason Robards and Elizabeth Wilson in You Can’t Take It With You.  Law and Order beckoned twice, but Mundy’s swan song came in daytime – as late as 2001 (when she was eighty-five), the actress was recurring as a Hungarian matron on All My Children.

    Mundy with Dennis Hopper in Naked City (“Shoes For Vinnie Winford,” 1961)
    Posted by Stephen Bowie 
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  5. Paul Raven added a post in a topic As The World Turns Discussion Thread   

    Reading old synopses about the introduction of Melinda Grey in August 77. TPTB obviously wanted a new young character on the show and tied her to Kim,Bob etc by making her Jennifer Hughes' long lost daughter.
    I wonder why they went to all the trouble of creating Melinda when Jennifer's daughter Barbara already existed? She was in the same age range and had been off the canvas for years after a short time onscreen.So her personality could have been shaped to that of Melinda.
    Also,that brings up some questions.
    If Barbara and Melinda were around the same age,what were the circumstances of Melinda's conception? Who was her father? Shortly after giving up Melinda did she marry Chuck Ryan and get pregnant with Barbara?
    How was it explained that Barbara never visited her mom when she was sick and died? Was this dealt with when Barbara finally arrived in Oakdale in late 78?
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  6. Paul Raven added a post in a topic DAYS: Set List Leaders: 2009-2015   

    I have seen stills from the early days showing the terrace outside the french windows in the living room.The dining room ,I believe was beside the living room on the fireplace side with entrance doors forward of the fireplace(now out of camera range).
    I read somewhere that the set had been built for a sitcom pilot. It was quite a large and detailed set,especially compared to other soaps of the time.
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  7. Paul Raven added a post in a topic DAYS: Set List Leaders: 2009-2015   

    What changes (apart from furnishings) have been made to the Horton Living Room set since 1965?
    I remember a few years back, it was stated that that set would be retired but then there was a change of heart.
    Jason,can you help with any of this?
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  8. Paul Raven added a post in a topic RIP Mike Minor   

    He was also Norman Garrison on ATWT in the mid/late 70's and Dr Royal Dunning on AW around 83/84.
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  9. Paul Raven added a post in a topic The Doctors   

    The Doctors on Retro is now up to October 1970. The Pollocks began as headwriters this week and Liz Hubbard returned as Althea.
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  10. Paul Raven added a post in a topic Y&R: Old Articles   

    Bill Bell was criticized at the time for having Jack hold the threat of paternity over Ashley at that time.Jack would never have done that to John or Ashley.
    Glad to see some Sandra Nelson love here. YR fan is right,Sandra's Phyllis was areal threat whereas from Day 1 I found Michelle's Phyllis to be too cartoony to be a real threat.I was waiting for Danny and Cricket to laugh at her and tell her to get lost...
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  11. Paul Raven added a post in a topic Y&R: Jess Walton Interview   

    Jess is so classy. Her attitude towards the show these days is probably the best course to take.I wonder is some of the other vets feel the same way and just take it day by day and look for the substance in a scene rather than  worry about the awful stories or character assasinations
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  12. Paul Raven added a post in a topic DAYS: January 2016 Discussion Thread   

    No more 70+ year olds please...
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  13. Paul Raven added a post in a topic B&B: Dawn Wells guest stars   

    They should have got Tina Louise as well. That would have been epic...
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  14. Paul Raven added a post in a topic DAYS: January 2016 Discussion Thread   

    I would think the high school and warehouse scenes were shot at the studio eg in the admin area or a basement rather than the official Days studio.
    Theo is cute but Thaao is looking ghoulish these days.
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  15. Paul Raven added a post in a topic DAYS: January 2016 Discussion Thread   

    Stefano's death should have been huge. Start with a big promo
    For years he has wreaked havoc on their lives...various flashback shots of Stef over the years
    Now he must finally pay the price...close up of gun firing,Stefano slumping
    One of these Salem residents has had enough...montage of various characters
    But who will be the one to finally end his reign of terror??
    So viewers know from the start that someone will kill Stefano off for good and can go along for the ride.
     
     
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